Feel Good Stories about Medicare CGM Coverage

Although those of us on Medicare are thankful that CMS now covers the Dexcom G5, many online discussions are angry and focused on the frustrating regulation that we are not allowed to use our smartphones, smart watches, and pumps as receivers. I wrote a blogpost about this in August and unfortunately there have been no changes to the policy. In fact the most recent news indicates that legislative action might be required to pull Medicare into the 21st century and mobile health technology.

Today I don’t want to write about gloom and doom. I want to focus on good things and how CGM coverage is improving the lives of many Medicare beneficiaries with diabetes. Without fail D-people are finding the Dexcom G5 to be a life-changing device that helps them monitor blood sugar trends along with receiving warnings of highs and lows. Universally CGM users are learning new things about their diabetes and several have experienced huge improvements in average blood glucose levels and A1c’s. Those who are using a Dexcom CGM for the first time mention a reduction in fear and a new ability to feel “almost normal.”

One thing that I have learned in recent months is that I need to stop saying “seniors” in connection to Medicare. Several people I’ve communicated with about this article are on Medicare due to disability and are not yet 65 years old. At the same time, most of us in the Seniors with sensors (CGM’s) Facebook group are 65+ and have lived with diabetes for a long time.

Here are some stories.

Carol W

Carol W and I are email friends—the digital age version of pen pals. She has had Type 1 diabetes for 55 years since age 5 and qualified for Medicare 12 years ago due to diabetes-related vision loss. For many years Carol has lived in the no-win zone where she needs tight control to manage current and avoid future complications while trying to avoid life-threatening lows. Carol lives alone and in February had a severe overnight hypo resulting in a hit to her head, two black eyes, and severe leg seizures. She doesn’t remember the fall. Her only recourse at that point was to begin setting an alarm for 3 AM to ensure that she was okay. Although Carol and her doctor knew that a CGM would greatly benefit her, she was unable to afford the device without coverage by Medicare.

Fast forward to today. Carol received her Dexcom G5 kit in September. Unable to get training at her diabetes clinic for at least two months, she overcame her fear of the insertion needle and started her first sensor with a Dexcom trainer coaching her over the telephone. Some of Carol’s remarks illustrate the life-changing benefits of CGM coverage.

In Carol W’s words:  “Tiny victory yesterday doing all the things I always need to do and made it through the entire day without any lows/highs or ALL THE TESTING with the meter.   Glorious to feel more “normal” – like the days when I didn’t have to test so often. I paid dearly for those days before tight glucose control though. I lost most of my eyesight…. I was able to go play with my neighbor’s one year old yesterday and didn’t have to think about testing. I just checked the receiver. It is truly amazing! I can go outside and garden and just check the receiver. So happy.”

Nolan

I met Nolan through Facebook and we chat periodically through Messenger. Nolan has had Type 1 diabetes for over 50 years. He has used an insulin pump for 25+ years and a CGM for 8+ years. CGM’s have protected Nolan from severe overnight lows and allowed him to sever his relationship with the local EMS and fire department. Because of the importance of a CGM for his safety, Nolan was self-funding his Dexcom for the last two years. This was stressful for the household finances because he is retired with a limited income.

Nolan has experienced the gamut of Medicare CGM experiences. He was one of the few seniors who received G5 supplies from Liberty Medical in the few months that it was the Medicare supplier. Because of no Medicare reimbursement for the starter kit, Nolan was afraid to use the supplies until October when Liberty assured him that he would not be responsible for the cost. A few weeks later Nolan sounded the alarm that “Big Brother is watching” as he got a call from Dexcom indicating that he was on the list of non-compliant seniors using the G5 mobile app. Although he had been using supplies purchased prior to Medicare coverage and thought that was allowed, Nolan learned that we must delete the G5 app from our phone as soon as our Medicare G5 kit is shipped. Violators were warned that if they were flagged again, Dexcom would no longer provide them with Medicare supplies.

In Nolan words:  “Some of the CMS / Medicare bureaucratic issues are just plain ‘non-sensical’ but it certainly is not the end of the world…. Due to my age, length of time I’ve had T1D I just can’t sense the very low BG situations and my CGM has been simply a Godsend for me and my wife in that regard. Simply put I consider the G5 CGM to be a lifesaver for me.”

Carol G

Diagnosed at age 41, Carol G has lived with Type 1 diabetes for 31 years. She uses multiple daily injections and had never used a sensor prior to Medicare CGM coverage. She knew that she was losing her ability to sense low blood sugars but was uncomfortable with paying out of pocket for a Dexcom.

Carol has been blown away by what she has learned since starting to use a Dexcom G5 in late August. She immediately began to see rollercoaster highs and lows that she had no idea were happening between finger pricks. Although disappointed that the Omnipod is not covered by Medicare, she is seriously looking at pumps as the best way to smooth out her blood sugar. Carol had an unhappy learning experience twelve days after starting her CGM. She accidentally dropped her receiver into the dishwasher where it irreversibly died! Dexcom offered a one-time receiver replacement cost of $200 and after nine very anxious days, she was back to using her G5.

In Carol G’s words:  “My first few days with the G5 were a real eye-opener for me.  I couldn’t believe how many spikes and dives my receiver was showing. And how many alerts I received—at all hours of the night. My mind was going a mile a minute. What changes could I make to stop the alerts, and even-out my “hills and valleys”? I had a long phone conversation with my Dr., but realized that I was mostly in charge of this journey…. I met with my PCP recently—the first appointment since getting the G5…. I was thrilled my A1c had dropped two points since my last appointment.”

Lloyd, Kathy, and Sharon

Lloyd has had Type 2 diabetes for 23 years and I shared his story in an October blogpost. Lloyd has been amazed at the accuracy of his new Dexcom G5 and has identified previously unrecognized lows. He finds that the “load” of managing diabetes seem heavier as a senior.

In Lloyd’s words:  “Decades of experience, great tools, and the load seems heavier to me. I really wasn’t frustrated when you interviewed me, BUT I AM NOW!… I used to be able to manage D in my sleep, now I’d settle for being successful period.”

Kathy is on Medicare due to disability and has lived a nightmare trying to get CGM coverage since Dexcom does not have a contract with her Advantage plan. She is grateful to have access to supplies comped by Dexcom and is looking for a new insurance plan for 2018. Kathy is the poster child for learning a lot about “her diabetes” through CGM use.

In Kathy’s words:  “As a benefit, my bs has dropped from avg 166 down to 127 in 30 days, pretty exciting. The numbers are not as significant to me as the trends: how much to correct highs, dose correctly at the start, toss problem foods, add more protein to each meal. Also a walk uphill drops me 70 points on a straight down double arrow, so its good for me to start a little high.”

Sharon lives with diabetes because of the surgical removal of her pancreas 20 years ago. It took 3 months for her to receive a Dexcom due to the distributor asking for BG logs and doctor notes, then signed logs and signed notes, and finally dated signed logs and dated signed notes. After starting to use a G5, Sharon quickly lowered her A1c from 8.3 to 6.8. She personally is not bothered by the inability to use a smartphone but feels strongly that Medicare beneficiaries deserve access to current technology.

In Sharon’s words:  “But there are people who are reliant on family and friends, although going into a nursing home is not a good alternative, cause they’ll just take away our pumps and cgms and put us on a sliding scale. I hope Medicare will get enlightened about Diabetes so we can get to a closed loop solution. Older people can really benefit from this coverage. It is a life-saver.”

Summary

Medicare coverage of continuous glucose monitoring is not perfect. There are wrinkles and delays in obtaining coverage. The inability to use mobile technology is nonsensical. It is frustrating not to be able to use a Tandem X2 pump as a receiver and to not have access to the Dexcom touchscreen receiver. At the same time CGM coverage is life-changing for Medicare beneficiaries with diabetes. Every person who contributed to this post is living with less fear, more safety, and the ability to live a more normal life. Many people are seeing immediate improvements in their diabetes numbers along with a new understanding of the journey that is “their diabetes”.

Yes, there is work to be done. But we are on the right path.

Tandem t:slim X2 and Dexcom G5:  It takes Flexibility

Last Wednesday I received my email from Tandem with the upgrade code to add Dexcom G5 integration to my pump. A great feature of the t:slim X2 is the ability to perform software updates at home rather than need a hardware replacement every time new capabilities are added to the pump. This first X2 software update adds Dexcom G5 receiver functions to the pump in anticipation of future updates adding threshold suspend and other insulin dosing algorithms. Tandem has a catchy slogan for the X2: “The pump that gets updated, not outdated.”

My Upgrade Experience

I followed the instructions for the upgrade and for the most part, it went well. I had one glitch where an error code indicated that my pump was communicating with another device. I restarted the upgrade and everything went fine. I had not been using my Dexcom receiver and I was assured by other X2 users on Facebook that I could leave the G5 app running on my iPhone and Apple Watch. (Note: the Dexcom G5 transmitter can only communicate with one receiver and one smart device. You cannot use the X2 and the G5 receiver at the same time.)

For the first hour I received an unbroken every-5 minute tracing of my Dexcom readings. After that it went haywire and I got only 2 readings in the next hour. I continued to get multiple Out of Range alerts as the day went on.

When you use a tubed pump, your pump is never far away from your CGM transmitter. My Tandem pump was in a pocket. My Dexcom transmitter was on my arm. My iPhone was on the table, in a pocket, in the kitchen, in my purse and not missing a dot. The pump was struggling with 12 inches.

I called Tandem twice over the next couple of hours and with a little troubleshooting it was apparent that I shouldn’t be having such problems. As always, the Tandem reps were helpful and the second rep indicated that many similar problems had been solved by a new transmitter. My current transmitter has been in use for a month and seemingly fine, but I wasn’t going to argue with trying a new transmitter.

I received the new transmitter on Saturday and will begin using it with my next sensor.

Meanwhile I have begun to get better communication with my Dex sensor, but it is not because the pump is better at picking up the signal. It is because I am making changes. I initially kept my pump in my left front pocket with the sensor on my right arm. I am now wearing the pump clipped to my waistband on the right side. I still lose signal when I sit in my normal “easy chair” and my arm is against the back cushion. (My phone does not lose signal in this scenario.) But I am getting better at moving to the right side of the chair and keeping my arm on the armrest so that the transmitter is not obstructed. I prefer my pump in my pocket, but I can get used to the waistband.

Basically I am being flexible to make things work.

Pump Case

Somehow every change I make impacts something else. Wearing the pump on my waistband has brought back the problem that the clip on the new case is neither tight enough nor long enough to keep the pump secure in the vertical position. Over two days it fell off 5 or 6 times and was saved from hitting the floor only by yanking on my infusion set. Miraculously the infusion set never ripped off. I decided to do a hack of adding a piece of Velcro to the tip of the clip. Bad hack. The Velcro made it difficult to slide the pump onto my waistband. Ultimately I broke the clip off the case by trying to open it wide to pull onto my pants. Definitely user error and because I was given the case for free, I will eventually just order another one.

Second hack. I am back to using a Nite Ize Hip Clip that is attached directly to the pump. When I used this clip a few months back, it also tended to fall off my waistband but not as badly as the Tandem case. This time I put a small piece of Velcro on the pump side of the clip and it hasn’t fallen off once. Of course so far it is only a 3-day experiment.

I am not done yet with figuring out a case hack and think it will involve a Nite Ize clip attached to the Tandem case and a small piece of Velcro. Or maybe just Velcro attached to the case using the Tandem clip. Although the Hip Clip attached directly to the pump is working OK, I prefer the protection of a case. My false occlusion alarms were eliminated by using a case and I am hesitant to go without one. I’ll definitely write another blogpost once I decide on an ultimate fix.

Summary

I like having my G5 information on my pump and I will continue to be as flexible as possible to make it work. Although there is some frustration that my relationship with the X2 is a bit temperamental—first due to occlusion alarms and now to CGM reception—I am still very happy with the pump. In general if I go back and look at the  various pumps and CGMs that I have used since 2005, they have all required me to learn, change, and be flexible to ensure success.

Medicare?

Now I get to the nitty-gritty of this newest update. What are the Medicare repercussions??? I’m flexible, but I can’t say the same thing for Medicare.

I have discussed more than once the stupidity of the Medicare ban on smartphone use for Dexcom G5 users. I’m not going there today. However, I have been hoping that because the Tandem X2 is durable medical equipment (DME) and not a smartphone that I will be able to use it as my CGM receiver instead of the Dexcom receiver.

When I read the Noridian Medicare coding and coverage document released in March, I do not believe that the X2 violates the guidelines:

“Coverage of the CGM system supply allowance is limited to those therapeutic CGM systems where the beneficiary ONLY uses a receiver classified as DME to display glucose data.  If a beneficiary uses a non-DME device (smart phone, tablet, etc.) as the display device, either separately or in combination with a receiver classified as DME, the supply allowance is non-covered by Medicare.”

Unfortunately I have heard from several sources that Dexcom is instructing Medicare customers that current Medicare instructions mandate use of the Dexcom receiver. I suppose justification for that comes from the first sentence of the Noridian document: “The Dexcom G5® Mobile CGM System is currently the only FDA-approved device with a “non-adjunctive” indication.” Although my Tandem pump works with the G5 Mobile CGM System, it is technically not part of the system according to Medicare. Some Tandem pumpers have also been told by Tandem that the X2 is currently not approved by Medicare to be used as a Dexcom G5 receiver.

I continue to be optimistic that Medicare regulations regarding the Dexcom G5 will be changed to allow use of a smartphone and use of the Tandem X2. I have no predictions for a timetable for those changes. In the short run I am still using Dexcom supplies purchased before Medicare and continue to use my iPhone, Apple Watch, and Tandem X2 pump. In the long run I will follow Medicare regulations because CGM coverage is too valuable to risk losing that coverage.

As always with diabetes, I will be flexible.

 

Medicare and CGM Coverage: Swirling Emotions

If you’ve been following the saga of Medicare coverage for the Dexcom G5 CGM, you know that Medicare beneficiaries will be forced to use the Dexcom receiver while being absolutely forbidden from using smartphones and the G5 and Follow apps. Coding and Coverage information released by Noridian Medicare in March 2017 clearly states this Medicare policy:

“Coverage of the CGM system supply allowance is limited to those therapeutic CGM systems where the beneficiary ONLY uses a receiver classified as DME to display glucose data.  If a beneficiary uses a non-DME device (smart phone, tablet, etc.) as the display device, either separately or in combination with a receiver classified as DME, the supply allowance is non-covered by Medicare.”

Few people in the diabetes community think that this makes sense, but for now it is the rule. Most of us on Medicare are grateful for the thousands of dollars we will save annually by having our Dexcom G5’s reimbursed, but emotions are swirling. JOY for coverage. ANGER at the restrictions. ANTICIPATION that sensors will be shipped soon. DISGUST that seniors are being treated differently. FEAR that no longer can our caretakers track our numbers in real time. SADNESS that we are losing access to our phones and watches. TRUST that this policy will change.

Lately I have been waking up in the middle of the night and stewing about being forced to abandon my smartphone and Apple Watch as Dexcom receivers. I worry about whether I will be able to integrate my G5 into my t:slim X2 insulin pump once the the Tandem software is approved. In the light of day I try to sort through my feelings knowing that I shouldn’t lose sleep over this. Mostly I feel frustration because it is a stupid ruling that I have little recourse to challenge. There is sadness because I really like my having CGM number on my watch. There is the sense of loss taking away something that I once had. And not to be ignored is the spoiled-child syndrome that “I want what I want when I want it!” and it’s unfair that others have it and I can’t.

For the most part anger about this situation is not one of my emotions, but others are frustrated, furious, and ready to do battle. A couple of quotes from Facebook:

“This is a ridiculous and ageist policy and I have said it many times. It’s not right.”

“I find it abhorrent that Dexcom G5 is MEANT to be used with smart technology and ANYONE not on MEDICARE has this option.”

“There is no way I can sign that form. It’s aggressive and hostile and incredibly ageist.”

Another emotion I do not have is fear. I currently neither use the Share app nor need someone alerted to my highs and lows. But others are dependent on a caretaker monitoring their BG levels and their safety is jeopardized with the denial of cell phone use.  Some Medicare recipients have disabilities such as low vision that make the larger screens and adaptability features of smartphones a better choice than the small screen of a Dexcom receiver.

“My T1D husband has a traumatic brain injury. So it is invaluable to me, his 24/7 caregiver for 3 1/2 years to be able to use the share/follow app.”

“Share has saved my life a couple of times on the G4 when I was mowing grass and didn’t hear the Dexcom alarm, but I did hear my phone when my wife called.”

“I don’t feel my Lows and my guy gets the alarm on his phone….This is a *safety issue* in my opinion. If we were totally able to feel things and get through without the chance of conking out we wouldn’t even need the darn CGM.”

“I have retinopathy of prematurity and have always had bad vision. Seeing my Dexcom readings on the iPhone is much easier than on a small receiver.”

My Thoughts and Things to Remember:

When my reasonable brain takes control, I know that I will survive using my Dexcom receiver. That is all I had for the first seven years of my nine years using a CGM.

I don’t have medical reasons that my iPhone and Apple Watch are better than my receiver. In fact I prefer dismissing alerts on the receiver because I can just push the button and not even look at the number! BTW that is a bad thing…. On the phone, I need to scan my fingerprint, tap on the alert, and go to the Dex app to dismiss it. I will miss automatic syncing of my G5 numbers to Dexcom Clarity, Tidepool, mySugr, and other apps, but I will survive.

My blog was started in the spring of 2013 and quickly became known for advocacy for Medicare Coverage of CGM’s. If at any point we had been offered the possibility of CGM reimbursement contingent on no smartphone use, we would have jumped at the chance. What we’ve got now is not perfect but it is thousands of dollars per year better than nothing.

Right now I think a lot of my stress comes from just not knowing what is going on. Through the early months of working out the logistics of Medicare, Dexcom did not do a good job of communicating with seniors. Some people were getting email updates. Others of us called Dexcom numerous times to be put on “The List” and never received any information. Seniors are still being told different things by different representatives from Dexcom, DME suppliers, pump companies, and medical professionals. Fortunately there is now some information on the Dexcom website but it does not answer all of my questions. I will definitely have an easier time coping once I know the rules of the game along with hardware and software modifications.

For the most part I am resigned to the Medicare restrictions and am working to accept them. In the short run I think we need to get Medicare reimbursement established before fighting the smartphone ban. Others disagree with me and are making calls, writing letters, starting petitions, and even hiring lawyers. And that is good because although patience is sometimes the best strategy, other times anger and in-your-face advocacy are the only way to force change.

Right now I know that whatever the policy ends up being, I will adapt. I haven’t used a receiver in years, but I’ll get used to it again. I can’t live in fighting mode all of the time and right now need to find acceptance. Although I know that I will eventually take my place on the battlefield fighting Medicare CGM policies, at the moment I am choosing to let things take their course and trust that Dexcom and JDRF will get this changed. At the same time I am cheering on those actively opposing Medicare. One online friend sums up my views perfectly:

“A year or two ago we were all writing letters to our Congressmen to get on board with a bill to have Medicare pay for the Dexcom. Now that is is approved, I’ve decided to let go of any anger and resentment (never does a diabetic good anyway) and am thankful for the approval and the fact that I won’t be paying out of pocket anymore, despite the absurdity of Medicare’s restrictions. However, I will still work in any way I can to change those restrictions if possible.”

Another senior stated it even more succinctly:

“It is what it is. You want Dexcom through Medicare? You sign the form.”

Amen.

 

Note: This blogpost only addresses the smartphone ban for Medicare coverage of the Dexcom G5. There are other problematic policies such as only 2 test strips per day being provided to CGM users. Those issues are in the wait-and-see category and worthy of discussion another time.

Dexcom G5 and Medicare:  What’s Going On?

History

On January 12, 2017, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) released a ruling indicating that the Dexcom G5 CGM was a therapeutic medical device and eligible for reimbursement as Durable Medical Equipment (DME). I published a blogpost on 1/15/17 discussing this ruling and I urge you to read it as background for what has been going on (or not going on) in the last six months.

On 6/1/17 Mike Hoskins of Diabetes Mine published an article titled “Stuck Waiting for Medicare CGM Access” and this is good background for connecting the dots from January to June. Yours truly (Laddie Lindahl in Minnesota!!!) was one of the seniors highlighted in the article. Mike summed up the last six months pretty well by writing:

“but so far CMS has not proposed a national coverage policy. As a result, many PWDs on Medicare who previously had coverage or are trying to get CGM coverage are being told they can’t get the devices and supplies they need because “nothing is finalized yet.”

I found the end of the Diabetes Mine article to be quite alarming as Mike suggested:

“Insurance companies send out their contracts to medical supply distributors during the summer months, leading up to open enrollment periods that typically start in the Fall months. So right now is a critical time. Contracts are being crafted and finalized, and with all this Medicare CGM confusion, insurers and third-party distributors may very well simply leave out any language about Dexcom G5 coverage. Effectively, Medicare CGM’ers could face no coverage for their Dexcom supplies for 2018 because so much is up in the air right now.”

I transitioned to Medicare in April anI have been able to continue using my Dexcom CGM due to an extra G4 transmitter saved from my free upgrade to the G5 and from a couple of boxes of stockpiled sensors. Everything I am using is out of warranty, but it works. I am okay….but only for a while. This spring it was announced that Liberty Medical was going to be the authorized Medicare supplier for the Dexcom G5. They were quickly overwhelmed by the demand. (Who knew that it was so complicated?) I placed an order with Liberty and canceled it within a few days of shipping. It had become common knowledge that Liberty was not being reimbursed by Medicare and those of us placing orders might be responsible for the out-of-pocket cost. Meanwhile Liberty withdrew from supplying G5 supplies under Medicare as of 5/28/17.

Where are We Now?

I have had no reliable information source during the last weeks and months, but I have managed to piece together some news. Here is some info with the source and I’ll let you judge the reliability.

Dexcom: Some people on Facebook have mentioned email updates from Dexcom and I have called the company several times and was assured that I was on “The List.” I’ve never received an email. Yesterday I called Dexcom and learned a few new things.

1) Dexcom has set up a Medicare link in their phone menu. Call the Customer Service number at 888-738-3646. Select Option #1 for placing an order. Within that menu, select Option #1 for Medicare Help. Please note that Dexcom is experiencing high call volume about Medicare and I waited almost 10 minutes on hold.

2) If you are desperately out of supplies, call Dexcom and in some cases they are providing supplies.

3) I suggest that you call Dexcom to ensure that your account has the correct insurance information. On Tuesday mine was showing private insurance and Edgepark as my supplier. It has now been corrected to show Medicare as my primary and BCBS as my supplemental.

4) I was told on Tuesday that we each have a “Reorder Specialist” assigned to our account. I found out the name of my specialist and got his contact information. I was told that these specialists are sending out the informational emails and I had not received any because I was not “in his pipeline.”

Facebook: I am in a Facebook group called Seniors with sensors (CGM’s) where members share their experiences and opinions. Of course a lot of the info is “my endo told me” or “the Dexcom email said” or “the letter from Liberty said.”  We all know that the world will collapse into a black hole when Facebook is the source of all knowledge, but here are some things that I have learned:

“I heard from my endo this morning that Dexcom will be doing their own distribution for their Medicare CGM products. No third party like Liberty Medical (thank god.) The hang up at the moment is they are looking for a supplier for meters/strips which Medicare is requiring.” 6/21/17

“Dexcom also told me this week that they will be distributors.” 6/21/17

“I just got off the phone with a very nice Dex Customer Service Rep. Still many unanswered questions from Medicare but she says they expect to be alerting those on the waiting list by end of June” (The rep I spoke with yesterday was unwilling to give me any timetable.) 6/19/17

‘Did you get the email today from Dex with updated requirements from Medicare? They are ” working on it .” Still no way we can use phone / watch combo. I think that ageist and unfair.” 6/15/17

Diabetes Mine: In a 6/15/17 article about the ADA Scientific Sessions, Mike Hoskins and Amy Tenderich shared an update from Dexcom executives:

“If you’re wondering what’s going on with Medicare coverage of Dexcom CGM, here’s the rub: CMS has mandated that Dexcom ship out to Medicare patients “everything they would need” to use the product. Since calibrations with a fingerstick meter are required, that means Dexcom has to find a traditional meter company to partner with to actually ship meters and test strips in the package with their CGM. Kinda crazy, and definitely creating delays for the company and its customers!”

The Part We Hate!

It is becoming increasingly clear that unless things change, Medicare users of the Dexcom G5 will be forbidden from using their smartphones in any form. I understand and previously wrote about the importance of the receiver in allowing the G5 to be designated as DME. The idea that one cannot use a smartphone in conjunction with the receiver is absurd. The dollar value of Medicare reimbursement is significant enough that I can go back to using my receiver, but I hate the idea of abandoning my phone and especially the ability to see my Dexcom numbers on my Apple Watch.

For me it is an inconvenience. But how about those seniors who benefit from someone using the Follow app to monitor their BG trends. How about those seniors who use the accessibility features of their iPhone to access their BG numbers?

It is a stupid requirement. At the same time, my personal feeling is that we need to establish Medicare CGM coverage before we fight this battle. If you read the original CMS ruling, the only reason that the Dexcom G5 qualifies as DME is because of the receiver. If we don’t need the receiver, then unfortunately the G5 is no longer DME. So we need to be careful. That is my 2 cents!!!

What Others Are Saying?

When I began writing this blogpost, I asked my fellow seniors from the Seniors with sensors (CGM’s) Facebook group to share their thoughts. I learned a lot.

“Although it will be a inconvenience for most of us, which will hopefully be temporary, those using the Tandem X2 insulin pump or an Apple Watch series 2 should still be able to connect directly to the Dexcom G5 via Bluetooth by this fall with expected software upgrades from both Apple and Tandem”  —Larry

My T1D husband has a traumatic brain injury. So it is invaluable to me, his 24/7 caregiver for 3 1/2 years to be able to use the share/follow app. He had a severe car accident due to a low blood sugar which the initial 4 months of hospitalizations and rehabilitation cost almost 2 million dollars. If he would have just had a CGM it would have saved all that money, he would still be working and not on disability, and I would still be working. Every diabetic at diagnosis should get a CGM and certainly should not get them taken away at medicare age. He got his after coming out of rehab. We as caregivers near and far need to be able to assist our diabetic family and friends with the features Dexcom has like Share and Follow. —Barry and Kim.

As a type one diabetic who lives alone, it is mandatory to have a CGM that is 100% covered by Medicare. This is a lifesaver. As much as I would hate to be without either my Tandem pump or my Dexcom CGM, my Dexcom is crucial to my daily survival. I will be eligible for Medicare in September, 2017, and I am so very disappointed to find that I will have fewer benefits than I do with private insurance now.  —Cindy

Laddie, my biggest concern is with the exclusion of phones, and especially smart watches from Medicare’s program. In my opinion the use of a Smartwatch to manage Bg and treat T1D is a major advance in T1D care. It is a real time process. No phone need come out of a pocket, no receiver from same or elsewhere. Tap your watch,see your Bg, make treatment decisions in real time. I have been absolutely amazed by this one simple process and the impact it’s had on my life and T1D management. Somehow we must get Medicare to recognize this and allow the use of this technology for treatment. Either that or Dexcom has to build a receiver/watch.  —Dave

I am a Therapist. The watch being important to my work. It is not possible for me to check my blood sugar on a receiver or even a phone at this point during office visits. This restriction on app use is going to cause a problem for me .  —Deidre

Two Medicare people in my household. Repeatedly denied CGM coverage despite multiple appeals and documented Certificates of Medical Necessity the app by my PCP/Endo. Brittle Type 1 46 years with history of severe hypos with seizures and one incident of Nocturnal hypoglycemia leading to coma. One incident of severe DKA requiring 5 days in ICU.  —John

I haven’t experienced a coma yet, but that’s what happens when you have no cgms or no partner to watch over you.  —Dianna

I know, Dianna. Before my CGM I was almost afraid to go to sleep at night.  —Cindy

Signed up for the CGM in January. Now middle of June. Still waiting. Yesterday, another low where I crawled to kitchen for OJ. Made it again. Every time, I wonder when the time will come when I don’t make it.  —Camille

Summary

I think that Camille said it all:  “Yesterday, another low where I crawled to kitchen for OJ. Made it again. Every time, I wonder when the time will come when I don’t make it.”

One Month of Medicare with Type 1 Diabetes

I thought it was going well.

Some of it is great.

I’m learning that maybe not everything is going so great.

I haven’t screamed at a phone menu yet.

I officially started Medicare on April 1. I seem to have figured out how to pay my bills through auto payment. I have received a box of pump supplies and have an order in place for CGM supplies. I have received my insulin at no cost through Medicare Part B and had another prescription covered at no charge through Part D. I belong to a new health club through a program offered by my supplemental insurance. On the surface all of this looks great and some of it is. Unfortunately not everything is going smoothly and Medicare is not approving everything.

What’s Going Great:

Silver&Fit:  This fitness program is a benefit of my BCBS Supplemental policy. It provides a membership at a participating fitness facility, an instructor-led class, or access to Home Fitness kits. I joined a club five minutes from home that has a huge number of work-out machines, weights, a spa, nutrition and fitness programs, locker rooms, and free fitness classes. I have been attending numerous strength and cardio classes and having a great time. No charge at all. My only limitation is that I can only use the club I joined and not the other branches around Minneapolis. I literally walked in the door and was a member 10 minutes later.

Doctor Visits: In April I had two routine doctor appointments. It was easy to provide my Medicare information and as far as I can see, they are being covered with no issues. I feel bad seeing how low the Medicare reimbursement is for my doctors.

Not Perfect but On the Right Track:

Insulin for Pump: As I explained in a previous Medicare blogpost, insulin for an insulin pump is covered under Part B DME. With my supplemental plan coverage that means I get my insulin at no cost. I am not bound by formulary restrictions nor does my insulin require a copay or put me into the Part D donut hole. The new prescription from my endocrinologist contained the required information and I spoke to a pharmacy tech to remind them to file it with Part B. Very quickly I got an email that the prescription was ready; it had been charged to my Part D plan with a charge of $481 for 3 vials.

The next morning I went to Walgreens and fortunately the pharmacist on duty knew how to correct the problem. She told me that it would be referred to the central Walgreens Medicare department and it might take 2 days to set up. That afternoon I got a call from the Medicare department and was asked for information such as my pump brand, model, serial number, purchase date, and whether it was paid for by Medicare or private insurance. That all made sense and was easy to provide. She finished our conversation with two questions. How tall are you? What do you weigh? Huh??? She said that my insulin would be ready for pick-up in an hour and it was.

Pump Supplies: In March I contacted Tandem Diabetes to learn my Medicare supplier for pump supplies. I was told that according to my supplemental insurance, I should use CCS Medical and Tandem would set up the account for me. CCS has been great so far and has contacted me and my endo’s office several times to get the necessary information. One requirement was a C-Peptide test which I had never had before in my diabetes career. As expected, I passed or failed the test depending on your criteria. I failed because I produce minimal to no insulin. I passed because I qualify for a pump and supplies under Medicare.

My pump supplies arrived quickly and were exactly as ordered. Last evening I went into the Medicare site to check my claims and was stunned to see that my pump supplies were denied. I called Medicare this morning and got no good answers as to why. It was suggested that maybe I was using the wrong supplier and I was given the name of another supplier who doesn’t even provide supplies for insulin pumps. I called CCS and the rep indicated that they were already working with Medicare to get it straightened out. She said that it was very common for supplies to be denied on the first go-round for patients new to Medicare. She assured me that everything is OK and I am choosing to believe her.

A Total Mess:

All of us on Medicare were thrilled when the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced in January 2017 that the Dexcom G5 was now covered as a therapeutic CGM under Medicare DME. Soon after that CMS released a document with preliminary coverage criteria and Liberty Medical was identified as the sole Medicare-approved supplier for the G5. Liberty was deluged with calls but managed to start shipping supplies to some customers. One caveat however. In order to receive supplies, you had to sign that you would be responsible for the cost of the supplies if you were not approved by Medicare. Meanwhile it was announced that more specific coverage criteria were still to be released and Medicare was not approving orders filled by Liberty.

Last week it became apparent that Liberty is not going to continue to supply G5 supplies for Medicare beneficiaries. All along Dexcom has indicated that it will not (cannot?) sell G5 supplies out-of-pocket to people covered by Medicare. Please note that the cash price from Liberty is much higher than the previous cash prices from Dexcom. Dexcom will sell G4 supplies to Medicare beneficiaries out-of-pocket. On Monday I received a letter from Liberty officially indicating that they are not going to provide Dexcom supplies after May 28. At this time there is no other supplier.

I placed an order at Liberty about a month ago. I was called last week to indicate that they had everything required to process my order and that it was under medical review. Today I canceled the order because I do not want to be stuck with the responsibility of getting an initial denial by Medicare, having to pay cash for the order, and then filing an appeal. I think I’ll wait to see what happens in coming weeks or months.

Dexcom has been quiet and provided little help to seniors. Today some people received a form letter from Dexcom indicating that they are working on the problem and stating: “If you have an immediate, critical need for Dexcom G5 Mobile CGM supplies, please contact Dexcom at 888-738-3646.” I did not receive the email.

So currently the Dexcom G5 is covered by Medicare, but not really. I am choosing to be patient and optimistic that everything will be worked out soon. Many other seniors on Facebook are angry and less optimistic.

Summary:

Some of my diabetes needs are being met through Medicare and other things are being worked out. So far I have had no problem reaching customer service reps at Medicare, CCS Medical, Walgreens, Dexcom and Liberty. Everyone has been polite and helpful to the best of their ability. Unfortunately no one at Dexcom or Liberty really seems to know what is going on and I believe them when they say the delay is with CMS. The Medicare Help Line was answered promptly but they could give me no reason for my supply denial and then nicely gave me inaccurate information. CCS Medical has been very responsive and so has Walgreens.

Right now I have everything that I need, but that won’t be true for the longterm. In the past I have often had problems when switching insurance plans and suppliers. I am hopeful that most of my Medicare problems are in the same category. I expect the pump supply problem to be resolved fairly quickly. I am less optimistic about CGM coverage.

So that’s today’s story about Medicare and Type 1 diabetes. Stay tuned for more. 😀

 

Countdown to Medicare with Type 1 Diabetes:  1 Month / Growing Old with T1D

Laddie_Head SquareI don’t have much to write about this month when it comes to Medicare. I am signed up for Medicare Part A and Part B. I have enrolled in a Supplemental Plan offered by BCBS of MN. I have selected an AARP Walgreen’s Part D drug plan. For better or worse I am ready to tackle Medicare on April 1.

Turning 65 years old and going on Medicare is a milestone in the progression of growing old. It is impossible for me to make this transition without thinking about growing old with Type 1 diabetes. Below you’ll find some of my thoughts.

The idea of “phases of aging” makes sense to me and I am moving into the “young-old” subgroup described in a Lumen Learning sociology course:

The United States’ older adult population can be divided into three life-stage subgroups: the young-old (approximately 65–74), the middle-old (ages 75–84), and the old-old (over age 85). Today’s young-old age group is generally happier, healthier, and financially better off than the young-old of previous generations.

As a young-old person who has lived with Type 1 diabetes for over 40 years, I am the most confident and empowered in relation to my diabetes than I have ever been. That is not going to change on April 1.

When I was diagnosed in 1976, I knew nothing about diabetes and had access to only a few books and magazines. Today the Internet has opened doors to scientific knowledge, professional recommendations, advocacy issues, and the cumulative knowledge of thecountdown-to-medicare-1-month Diabetes Online Community (DOC). Although I don’t blindly follow online diabetes advice and have never consumed okra water, I strongly believe that my fellow people with diabetes (PWD) have taught me almost everything I know about Type 1 and have motivated and empowered me to succeed. Continued learning about diabetes won’t go away just because I get a Medicare card.

I have lived a privileged diabetes life and have never worried about access to care. I understand that I will have a huge learning curve when it comes to getting supplies and medications under Medicare. I am not yet losing sleep over potential roadblocks although I know that it is naive to think that there won’t be any.

There is no doubt that improvements in both insulin formulations and technology have allowed me to reach age 65 in reasonably good health. I can’t envision what my health status would be (or if I would even still be alive) had I continued on my 1976 insulin regimen of one injection a day and no home BG monitoring. Insulin pumps and CGMs have exponentially increased the quality of my life. I can’t even begin to hypothesize on how and if Medicare will cover future diabetes tech such as artificial pancreas systems.

In some ways I am living with a different diabetes than at other stages of my life. Although hormones never completely disappear, they don’t rage as much for me anymore and are usually more predictable than when I was younger. In Figure 5-2 of Think Like a Pancreas, Gary Scheiner shows graphs of “typical basal insulin levels by age group.”

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The thick line is for ages 60 and older and shows a decrease in total basal insulin along with a sharper rise in insulin needs in the early morning hours. I am experiencing both of those changes and they didn’t make sense to me until I saw Gary’s chart. Most of my bolus ratios have remained the same so far.

Hypoglycemia unawareness is a mixed gift bag as I move into my senior years. On one hand, I feel better because I don’t get the sweats, shakiness, blurry vision, and insatiable hunger of my younger years. I also don’t tend to over-treat lows and multiple bowls of Frosted Flakes at 3:00am are a distant memory. At the same time I know that hypoglycemia is a huge problem for seniors with diabetes and my risks for falls, hospitalization, and permanent disability resulting from severe lows will increase. Knowing that Medicare will soon be covering CGMs for seniors is a huge relief, but I won’t consider it a done deal until I am approved under the not-yet-established CMS guidelines.

When I look at my diabetes, I am comfortable believing that I will be in control of my diabetes throughout my “young-old” years and hopefully well into my “middle-old” years. It is likely that I may require help with care at some point in my “old-old” years…. That terrifies me because I don’t trust anyone else to take care of my diabetes and my biggest fear of aging is losing independence.

Aging is a process. My life isn’t going to be much different on April 1 than it was on March 31. I’ll still have type 1 diabetes and will continue to test my blood and take insulin. I’ll still have arthritis and sometimes I worry more about that than diabetes. But one change that will happen is that I will finally start using the red, white, and blue Medicare card stashed in my wallet. Wish me luck.

Countdown to Medicare with Type 1 Diabetes: 2 Months / A Decision

Laddie_Head SquareI’ve made a decision, but will it matter in the long run?

A month ago I planned to sign up for a Platinum Blue Cost plan offered by Blue Cross Blue Shield of Minnesota. It seemed to promise a relatively easy transition into Medicare with the option of switching to the Senior Gold Supplemental plan within 12 months with no health questions. I believe that longterm Senior Gold is a safer plan for me because it covers all Medicare providers, guarantees no reduction in benefits, and provides better coverage when I am out of state. Unfortunately it is more expensive, mandates the use of Competitive Bidding suppliers, and requires the purchase of a separate drug plan. It should be okay for me to start on Platinum Blue and then switch to Senior Gold for 2018, but the BCBS rep has not been able to give me a link within the policy guaranteeing the ability to switch. I don’t trust anyone in today’s healthcare environment and I’ve decided to dive headfirst into Senior Gold and traditional Medicare.

Like most people living with a chronic medical condition, I am stressed to the max considering the present and future of healthcare in the United States. I am working to stay informed and involved in advocacy while protecting myself from going batshit crazy. I am rationing Facebook time, newspaper reading, and TV news. I am not worried that I willcountdown-to-medicare-2-months ever be in the position of having no access to some level of diabetes care. It may not be a state-of-the-art insulin pump and CGM, but I have to believe that I will always have access to insulin. I worry for other seniors who do not have the resources than I have. I worry for younger people as the protections of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) are repealed without a plan for the future. I worry that some of our elected representatives are more interested in reducing healthcare costs by limiting access to care rather than reining in costs, particularly drug costs.

The future of Medicare is a big unknown and I have read articles that suggest that the repeal of the ACA and changes to Medicaid will precede any major changes to Medicare. At the same time Tom Price, Trump’s cabinet nominee for the Department of Health and Human Services, is in favor of privatizing Medicare and House Speaker Paul Ryan has pledged to reform Medicare in 2017. A recent article in Forbes suggested that Trump might surprise everyone and come out in support of MFA (Medicare for All). So who knows? All I know is that we are in for a wild ride and probably not a ride that will be fun for people with pre-existing health conditions. I will enter Medicare trying to make the best choices I can while knowing that my choices might not matter at all as we move into a crapshoot future.

I haven’t selected a Part D drug plan yet. I currently take three drugs, four if you include insulin. Two have good coverage with any plan. The third is well-covered as a Tier 2 generic drug in the BCBS Platinum Blue formulary. Unfortunately this same drug is non-formulary and/or covered poorly in Part D plans. It’s been a good drug for me but not so great that I won’t be willing to switch to something more affordable.

I have received notification from SSA that I have been accepted into Parts A and B of Medicare. I have not yet received my Medicare card and that is required before I can apply for a supplemental or drug plan.

I am not dreading Medicare as much as when I started this series almost a year ago. I know some people with Type 1 diabetes who are thriving on Medicare and have learned to navigate the system to get the care and supplies they need. I know others who live on a 90-day cycle of frustration and fear as they repeatedly run into roadblocks getting test strips, insulin, and pump supplies. I know that I will go crazy when things don’t happen the way I expect and I will scream at automated phone menus. But I choose to be optimistic that I will get everything figured out. That might be blind, stupid optimism and I reserve the right to change my tune at any point in the future and start cursing and howling at the moon.

Medicare and CGM Coverage: Love Your Receiver!

Laddie_Head SquareI was surprised, thrilled, elated, stunned, relieved, and every other adjective that you can think of when I received Friday’s mass email from Derek App, JDRF President, with the breaking news:

CMS Labels Continuous Glucose Monitors as Durable Medical Equipment

JDRF is pleased to share that the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) decided today to recognize continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) devices approved for use in making diabetes treatment decisions as durable medical equipment, a significant step toward making them eligible for coverage under Medicare. Today’s decision lays a pathway toward extension of Medicare coverage for the devices that will bring the nation’s largest insurer in line with the vast majority of the country’s private payers. Although the significant benefits of CGM use have been known since 2008, CMS had previously refused to consider covering the devices under Medicare, saying they did not meet the statutory definitions of durable medical equipment or any other category the agency could cover. Today’s decision removes that impediment.

In recent years I have wavered between optimism and pessimism as I advocated, hoped, and prayed for Medicare coverage of continuous glucose monitors. Now it looks as though the day is coming! I don’t know how long it will be before procedures are in place for receiving reimbursement, but it will be soon. Soon may mean later in 2017. Soon may mean 2018. But there is finally a path in sight for Medicare reimbursement of CGM’s.

Today I read through the 15-page CMS Ruling with a yellow highlighter. You will find some of the specifics of the report well-described in Mike Hoskins’ Diabetes Mine article:  NEWSFLASH: Medicare Will Cover Some CGMs Now! Below I will expound on a couple of Mike’s points and then talk more about the specifics of durable medical equipment.

Dexcom Only: This ruling only applies to the Dexcom G5 because it is the only CGM approved by the FDA for insulin dosing. Therefore the G5 is the only system that fits the definition of a “therapeutic CGM.” Currently CGM systems by Medtronic have not been approved for insulin dosing and are considered “non-therapeutic.” They do not fit the definition of Durable Medical Equipment (DME).

No Guarantee of Coverage: This ruling only states that therapeutic CGM systems fall within the scope of Medicare Part B DME. There has not yet been a national coverage determination to guarantee approval if one satisfies still-to-be-determined coverage criteria. Right now MAC’s (Medicare Administrative Contractors) have the option of issuing local CGM coverage determinations or coverage may be obtained on a claim-by-claim basis. What does this mean? We will learn as Medicare beneficiaries begin filing claims for CGM coverage. You can bet that I will apply for coverage as soon as possible after starting Medicare in April.

All Types of Diabetes: Just as people with all types of diabetes are able to receive coverage for home BG monitoring, all PWD will be eligible for CGMs according to this ruling. Don’t get too excited because IMO the coverage criteria will most likely restrict reimbursement to some people with Type 1 diabetes and some insulin-using Type 2’s. Just as it is more difficult for Type 2’s to obtain coverage for insulin pumps, it may be more difficult for them to obtain CGM coverage. But this is still an improvement over the 2015 congressional bills (S.804 and H.R.1427) that specified Type 1 diabetes.

One thing not addressed in Mike’s article is how the Dexcom G5 fits into the Medicare definition of Durable Medical Equipment (DME).

According to the CMS ruling, there are 5 criteria which must be established in order for a device to considered as DME:

  • Can withstand repeated use;
  • Effective with respect to items classified as DME after January 1, 2012, has an expected life of at least 3 years;
  • Is primarily and customarily used to serve a medical purpose;
  • Generally is not useful to a person in the absence of an illness or injury; and
  • Is appropriate for use in the home.

Home blood glucose meters and supplies have been in this category for a long time. Technically the meters are “durable” and have an expected life of at least 3 years. For “multicomponent” systems, the other components are covered as long as one component (the meter) is “durable.” Therefore test strips are covered because they are an integral part of the system.

Looking at the Dexcom G5 system, CMS quickly specifies that sensors with an expected life of 1 week are not durable. Neither are transmitters with an expected life of 3 months. So we are left with the receiver. According to CMS, “reliability analysis data from an engineering firm that evaluated the receiver component of the recently approved therapeutic CGM predicts a lifetime of greater than 3 years for the receiver.” CMS goes on to say that the receiver “is the only component of the therapeutic CGM that can be considered durable and satisfy the 3-year MLR criterion of the definition.”

What does this mean? It means Love Your Receiver!!! Without the receiver, the Dexcom G5 system does not satisfy the criteria for DME.

dexcom-love-your-receiver

The FDA approval of the G5 system required the purchase of a receiver and many people complain about that requirement since they use their phones as the receiver. Just know that CMS is never going to classify your phone as a reimbursable medical device, so cherish your receiver even if you never take it out of the box. If you’re not on Medicare, still cherish your receiver so that seniors can receive CGM coverage! Also Medicare coverage of CGM’s is important for everyone because it is a vital component to coverage of artificial pancreas systems.

In the coming weeks and months, we will learn more about the implementation and impact of this CMS ruling. If you’d like to learn more, here are a few links.

Text of CMS Ruling

Diabetes Mine Analysis  

Diatribe’s Preliminary Analysis

Expanded Statement from JDRF

And no matter what, don’t forget to Love Your Receiver!

 

Countdown to Medicare with Type 1 Diabetes: 3 Months / It’s Happening

Laddie_Head SquareOn April 1, 2016 I started writing about my journey to Medicare with the sentence  “A year from today I will be on Medicare.”  With 3 months to go I’m not yet at the finish line. However, on January 1st I entered my “Initial Enrollment Period.” That means that I can finally start doing something about Medicare rather than just talking about it.

Tuesday morning I applied for Medicare benefits online. (I did not apply for monthly retirement cash benefits because as someone born in 1952, my NRA (Normal Retirement Age) to receive full benefits is age 66.) Enrollment in Medicare Part A (Hospital insurance) and Part B (Medical insurance) or Part B only is required before I can apply for a supplemental or cost/advantage plan in my state. Therefore I will need to wait for proof of enrollment and I assume that will be my red, white, and blue Medicare card.

The online enrollment was easy and I immediately received an email confirming my application. About 24 hours later, I received an email from SSA.gov indicating that my application was being processed and I could expect to receive a letter within 30 days.

Thank you for filing your Social Security application online. Our Social Security Office in CHICAGO, IL received your claim and will be working with you to process it. Our goal is to process all applications efficiently.

A representative may call you for more information at the phone number you provided on your application. Please be aware that our representative may call you outside normal business hours, such as on a weekend or during the evening. If we are unable to reach you by phone, we may also contact you by e-mail or U.S. mail.

You should receive a letter in the mail within 30 days with a decision or to request additional information. If you have a future month of entitlement, you should receive a letter in the mail approximately thirty days before your benefits should start. Also, you can check the status of your application at Status of your application or you may call us at (800) 842-0588 with questions. Please wait five days from the time that you filed before checking the status online.

Now my job is to reply to any requests for further information from a SSA representative and then to wait.

countdown-to-medicare-3-monthsUnless something happens in the next month to change my mind, I have decided to enroll in a Platinum Blue Cost plan offered by BlueCross BlueShield for 2017. I will write more about the decision in a future blogpost, but this plan essentially “cushions” my entrance into Medicare. It allows me to use BCBS DME suppliers and not deal with Competitive Bidding. It exempts me from several other Medicare regulations such as seeing my pump-prescribing physician every 3 months and extensive record keeping to justify more than 3 test strips per day. It includes prescription coverage and for the most part functions like the commercial insurance I currently use.

With any Cost plan in Minnesota I would have 6 months to switch to a Supplemental/Medigap plan with no questions about pre-existing health conditions. However, by going with the BCBS Cost plan, I am allowed 12 months to switch to Senior Gold, the supplemental plan offered by BCBS. I am still not sure about the best Medicare plan longterm, but this strategy buys me time to consider that choice again for 2018.

So now I wait.

Countdown to Medicare with Type 1 Diabetes:  4 Months / No Decision

Laddie_Head SquareI thought that I would have made a decision about Medicare by now and I haven’t. I don’t feel that I am much closer to a “right” decision than I was a few months ago. I have narrowed my choices to 3 plans: 2 Cost plans and 1 Supplemental plan. Each plan has definite pluses and minuses.

About 6 weeks ago I was close to making the decision to go with one of the Cost plans offered by BCBS of MN. The advantages of this plan are reasonable cost, excellent coverage for pump supplies, formulary inclusion for all of my drugs, and a preferred test strip brand that I am satisfied with. It allows me to use BCBS DME suppliers without dealing with the Competitive Bidding suppliers of Basic Medicare. With this plan I will have 12 months to change my mind and switch to the BCBS Supplemental plan with no consideration of pre-existing medical conditions. Therefore I can stay on this plan for all of 2017 and have all Medicare options available in 2018. The major disadvantages of this plan are no CGM coverage and that starting in 2017, Walgreen’s is not a preferred pharmacy. I have always had great service with Walgreen’s and my first choice is to stay with them.

A couple of weeks ago it was announced that Fairview, one of the major health systems in Minnesota, has not come to a network agreement with BCBS for 2017. Therefore many of my health providers will be out-of-network if I choose a BCBS Cost plan. I believe that an agreement will eventually be reached, but….

The second Cost plan that I am considering is offered by HealthPartners. The main advantage of this plan is that it provides CGM coverage. It should be a no-brainer to go with this plan, but co-pays for pump supplies and test strips cost substantially more than on the BCBS plan and the total cost of the two plans is about the same. Plus the preferred brand of test strips for HealthPartners is one that I have not had good success with. I will only have 6 months to revert to Basic Medicare and a Supplemental plan and I will need tocountdown-to-medicare-4-months re-evaluate my options partway through 2017.

The Supplemental plan that I am considering is BCBS Senior Gold. The advantages of Senior Gold are that benefits will never be reduced in the future and I can take the plan with me if I move out of Minnesota. With this plan I will experience few or no out-of-pocket costs. There are no network restrictions and I can see any provider who accepts Medicare. I can always choose to switch to a Cost or Advantage plan in the future. The downside is that Supplemental plans follow Medicare guidelines and there is no CGM coverage. Also I will be forced to use Competitive Bidding suppliers for mail order test strips and pump supplies. I will be required to see my endocrinologist every 90 days in order to receive pump supplies. Although this plan allows the most flexibility for future coverage, it is substantially more expensive than the two Cost plans I am considering.

I don’t know what I am going to choose. I have a list of questions that I will present to an insurance broker I have been in contact with and to a representative from my local SHIP agency. Because I do not need to make my decision until February, I have avoided recent contact with these consultants until the Medicare Open Enrollment period ends today.

Last month I wrote about the anxiety I was experiencing as I thought about Medicare. Today I am not worrying about it. Frankly there are so many unknowns that I am beginning to think that it may not matter what I decide. I have written that Medicare Cost plans are unique to Minnesota, Wisconsin, and a few other states. I was told by a representative from BCBS of MN that these plans will probably be disappearing in the next year or two due to pressure from Medicare. They will be replaced by Advantage plans with different guidelines and network restrictions but more similar to plans offered in other states. The plan I select now may possibly not exist in two years. I know people with diabetes who are using Supplemental plans. I know people with diabetes who are using Cost or Advantage plans. Whatever I select, I will be part of a population of people with diabetes who are in the same boat as I am.

Meanwhile a Trump presidency along with a Republican-controlled legislature is an indication that we may see substantial changes to Medicare in the coming years. Will current Medicare beneficiaries be exempt from future changes or will we all move into a new unproven system? What will happen to people with pre-existing conditions and serious illnesses?

I don’t know the answers to these questions. The only thing I know is that there may not be a “correct” decision for me to right now. There are different decisions. There is Plan A, Plan B, and Plan C. Maybe my choice will make a difference. Maybe it won’t.

I just don’t know.