Diabetes, Just Tell Me!

Lately I have been having days, well actually weeks when I am starting to question how I deal with my diabetes. I have used an insulin pump for 15 years and don’t really want to change back to injections. For me a pump is more convenient and allows multiple basal rates and easy bolusing through the day. I have used a continuous glucose monitor for 10 years and can’t or don’t want to imagine doing without the constant blood glucose numbers on my phone and watch. 

But lately I feel as though my tech has been failing me and I’ll show that through a couple of photos below.

The first day of a new Dexcom G5 sensor:

The graph of a pod starting to fail after less than two days. The downslope reflects a new pod:

But what if it isn’t my tech? What if it is just my body and my diabetes? I have seen a ton of crazy up arrows on my Dexcom in recent weeks and many of them have been unexpected. I am quick to blame the sensor but unfortunately most of the time my meter has confirmed the Himalayan-esque rises and falls. But sometimes it is the sensor. I have had numerous high BG numbers that have not resolved until I changed out a Tandem infusion set or these days, a new Pod. But sometimes the highs are from last night’s pizza or the second or third glass of wine. 

Most of the time I just don’t know. Why doesn’t diabetes just tell me the answer!?!

I know that my life is a constant science experiment and I am usually pretty good at figuring out what is going on. Although I get frustrated, angry, and guilty at some of my aberrant Dexcom graphs, I do my best to correct the numbers as quickly as possible. My A1c’s continue to be good and I feel good most of the time. And when I don’t feel good, arthritis is the culprit not endocrine issues. But Type 1 is always in the background laughing at my attempts at perfection. I‘m caught in the hamster wheel of trying to get it right. All of the time. But not changing my ways.

Sometimes I think the hardest part of diabetes is not always knowing the “why’s” of what is going on. Is my rising blood sugar this evening a result of what I ate for dinner? Or is my infusion site giving out? Is there a problem with air in my pump cartridge? Is the insulin old and compromised by the heat of my rechargeable pump battery? Most of us are familiar with the list that Adam Brown of Diatribe compiled titled “42 Factors That Affect Blood Glucose.” They all make sense but a checklist of possibilities doesn’t always help me dig out of today’s hole.

Why can’t degraded insulin turn purple? Why can’t my Dexcom have a footnote specifying whether a number is reliable or fantasy? Why can’t my body tell me whether an early morning high is hormones or a pod gone bad? Why can’t I have the type of diabetes that only drifts high and low instead of Dex double-upping or double-downing? I could go on with more why’s but I think you get the picture. 

To tell you the truth, I suspect that if blood glucose numbers were the #1 aim in my life, I would be better served by eating a Bernstein-ian ultra low carb diet and using a cocktail of insulin by injection. Although tech is great, I am lately not finding it to be very reliable. But I am stubborn and am somewhat addicted to the toys and challenge of diabetes tech.

So instead of going back to the basics, I am currently using an Omnipod in anticipation of starting to Loop. I have used three pods and not one of them has made it to 48 hours before soaring blood sugars. And I don’t know why. The idea that Looping with Omnipod is going to be successful for me is probably a pipe dream.

I think I might be dealing with diabetes distress but that’s not the subject of this post….

Diabetes and Older Adults: Modifying Targets and Treatment?

I am 67 years old and have lived with Type 1 diabetes for over 42 years. In the last year I have read a lot about the possibility that I should consider modifying the intensity of my diabetes regimen and relaxing my targets. My endocrinologist suggested the same thing during my December visit saying that I have a lot of cushion in my numbers and could raise them without risking complications. Okay, she actually said I don’t have to worry about complications 20 years down the road…. Doesn’t she think I’ll be an active and vibrant 87-year old?

An article was recently published in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism titled “Treatment of Diabetes in Older Adults: An Endocrine Society Clinical Practice Guideline.” The conclusions of the fairly long article were stated:

“Diabetes, particularly type 2, is becoming more prevalent in the general population, especially in individuals over the age of 65 years. The underlying pathophysiology of the disease in these patients is exacerbated by the direct effects of aging on metabolic regulation. Similarly, aging effects interact with diabetes to accelerate the progression of many common diabetes complications…. The goal is to give guidance to practicing health care providers that will benefit patients with diabetes (both type 1 and type 2), paying particular attention to avoiding unnecessary and/or harmful adverse effects.”

I was able to access the entire article online and was optimistic that I would find information relevant to my current age and diabetes status. The article addressed all seniors with diabetes which we know is mostly Pre-diabetes and Type 2. But Type 1 was specifically addressed in areas where our needs might differ from those with Type 2.

In general I found the article to be “unhelpful.” If you want to check it out, I suggest that you just read the first couple of pages which is the “List of Recommendations.” Most of the text after that was repetitive and didn’t provide specific guidance beyond the introductory list. 

Throughout the article the words and phrases that jumped out at me were heterogeneity, minimize hypoglycemia, simplify management, duration of diabetes, overall health, cognitive impairment, fall risk, and cardiovascular disease. Those are hugely important considerations for me and all people with diabetes. Unfortunately I have a hard time seeing myself in this article because the scope of the age and health status categories are too broad. Although the authors emphasized the heterogeneity of this population, I believe there was too little distinction between an active and relatively healthy 67 or 72 year old and someone in their late 80’s in a nursing home. But the authors specifically mentioned seniors who have lived with Type 1 for more than 40 years as a group that should be targeted for de-intensifying management. And that’s me.

Slightly off-topic:  As I was writing this blogpost, I read in the Minneapolis paper that Best Buy has purchased GreatCall to expand the “retailer’s connection to seniors.” As I was multi-tasking with my laptop, iPad, and iPhone, I shuddered at: “a diverse portfolio of devices tailored to older adults — including simple flip phones with large buttons and extra bright screens, wearable alert devices and a line of sensors for high-risk seniors that monitor daily activities at home.” Just as medical professionals need to consider seniors with diabetes who have come into the 21st century with pumps, CGM’s, low-carb diets, and the ability to maintain near-normal A1c’s, tech companies need to move beyond the stereotype of Grandma with a flip phone.

There may come a day when I need to simplify my diabetes regimen. But that is not today as I have recently ordered a Riley Link to experiment with looping using an Omnipod tubeless pump and my phone as the controller. I continue to be excited by new D-technology and don’t have cognitive impairment that limits my treatment options. Heck, the process of getting the medications and supplies that I need under Medicare require vigilance, organization, and super-cognition! I can still recite my 14-digit library card number and can easily remember 6-digit codes texted by Amazon and my bank.

My guess is that the “average” population of seniors who have lived with diabetes for 40, 50, and 60+ years is different than the seniors that I know online. Those of us involved in diabetes social media tend to be knowledgeable about our diabetes and highly motivated. Some of us have diabetes complications; some of us have other health issues; some of us struggle to get the care that we require. But as a group we are a bunch of opinionated, hard-headed seniors who battle for the medications and technology we want and need to keep us healthy. We are not ready to settle for high A1c’s and yesterday’s medications and tech.

And yes, I need to remember that someday I may need a flip phone with large buttons and an extra bright screen. I may be in a nursing home where I cannot care for my diabetes. Like many seniors who have lived a long time with Type 1 diabetes, I have no faith that anyone else will be able to care for me. Type 1 is really, really hard even with my experience, motivation, and access to current D-tools. I can’t imagine anyone else doing it nearly as well as I do. My aim is to maintain my health so that I can care for myself as long as possible. And then when I can no longer care for myself, I hope my sister will “do me in.” Okay, that is a warped family joke but my sister who also has Type 1 and I have long joked about and been terrified of becoming incapacitated seniors with diabetes.

I am aware that it might not be a bad idea to raise my BG targets. I have too many moderate lows and know that I am overconfident in the safety net that my Dexcom provides. I haven’t needed help with a low in years. But that doesn’t mean I won’t tomorrow.

But I don’t know how to do diabetes differently.

If I can’t get it right with a target of 90, why should I miraculously be able to get it right at 100 or 120? My diabetes problems are not 10-20 unit variations. I struggle with false occlusion alarms on my Tandem pump and often get skyrocketing numbers when the cartridge gets down to 30 units or less. I don’t go from 80 to 100. I go from 63 to 197 or 241. I am at an age where I don’t have a lot of hormonal excursions. But lately I am seeing lots of up and double-up Dexcom arrows from lowish-carb meals or 2 glucose tabs. Is my Dexcom wonky or am I? My meter would say that it is me. I think it is my pump. For sure my diet has had more carbs than I know that I can handle. The frustration is that I rarely know precisely what is driving my blood glucose aberrations.

Oh cr*p, it’s just diabetes.

At the moment I don’t see changing my diabetes care because of my age. At the same time there are studies indicating that I might live longer if my A1c was higher. But not too high. And not too low. I look forward to looping and hope that it will ease the burden of my care, especially overnight. If not, I don’t expect to be worse off. I look forward to the Basal IQ update with my Tandem pump but it has been delayed for 6-9 months due to Dexcom not supplying the Dexcom G6 to seniors on a timely basis. I look forward to the Tandem Control IQ update but am concerned that Medicare recipients will not get access to the software update due to the likelihood that there will be a charge for the upgrade. 

I know in the short run that it would be a good idea to reduce the number of moderate lows I experience but I am not convinced that can be achieved by relaxing my care and targets. Actually I believe that more intensive regimens like Looping, Basal IQ, and Control IQ can address hypos more effectively. And probably the best way to level out my blood glucose numbers would be to get back on the wagon with more disciplined lowish-carb eating.

So on to another day with diabetes….

Days in a Month with Diabetes

30 days hath September,

April, June and November.

All the rest have 31.

And February’s great with 28

                                     And Leap Year’s February’s fine with 29.

Medicare rations diabetes supplies on a strict 30-day or 90-day cycle. My Medicare suppliers are even worse and tend to think that months have 35 days and quarters have about 95-100 days.

Unfortunately no one has communicated that to my diabetes which trucks along with a strict 24/7/365 (or 24/7/366 in a Leap year) schedule.

I continue to rejoice that my Dexcom G5 CGM is covered by Medicare, but it has been frustrating that Medicare currently requires Dexcom to send out supplies monthly rather than quarterly. The personnel and shipping costs for Dexcom for this monthly distribution are probably substantial and every month seems to leak a few days between shipments. In 2018 most of my shipments were a couple of days to a week late and over the course of 12 months, I only received 11 Dexcom shipments. My guess is that my experience is reflective of that of most Medicare beneficiaries. That means that Dexcom lost one monthly subscription fee for each of us and that is a lot of money for a small company. I was lucky to come into Medicare with a cushion of CGM supplies and I have been okay with constantly late deliveries. I also know about Spike and xDrip where you can reset G5 transmitters to last longer than the software-mandated death of 90-104 days. But some Medicare users have had to go without their CGM when sensors and particularly transmitters have been delayed. There is sometimes an excuse such as backordered transmitters or insurance verification. This month I placed my order on the designated day and the very nice Dexcom rep offered no excuse when she said it wouldn’t ship for another week.

I have been most impacted by pump supplies. I went on Medicare in April of 2017 and I received my 4 boxes of pump supplies like clockwork. Medicare strictly requires that each infusion set will last 3 days and allows no cushion for painful or failed sites. Or aging skin and tissue which require 2 day sets changes. Or steel cannula sets which mandate a 2 day change. In 2017 my doctor’s letter of medical necessity for 4 boxes instead of 3 was accepted and I got the needed supplies. My first order of 2018 was shorted a box and the supplier was unwilling to work with me to override the restriction. I switched suppliers and seeming the override was fine. But they sent the order 10 days late. In infusion set language, 10 days is half a box of supplies for me. Then 3 months later, they wouldn’t send my order until 92 days had passed. Then the next order was another 10 days late. 

I have recently switched to Tandem TruSteel sets and seem to have better insulin absorption than with my previous VariSoft sets. And guess what! You can move the needle part of the set, reinsert it, and tape it down to get another day or two from the set. After two days, 90% of my TruSteel sites are slightly inflamed. So you go, Grandma!. Pull out the needle and tack it into another location. So far I have had no real infections and fortunately am very pain-sensitive and don’t try to extend puffy sites. But we all know that one ER visit or hospitalization would quickly blast past my Medicare-approved cost of $5.91 per infusion set.

Meanwhile diabetes keeps trucking along.

1, 2, 3, 4…..90 days.

If I did not extend infusion sets and have a stash, I would run out of supplies. 

Medicare teaches you to lie. When you call your supplier to renew your 90-day supply, you can’t have more than a week (or is it 10 days?) worth of pump supplies in your D-tub. I would never in a million years be comfortable being down to 3 or 4 infusion sets before ordering more. With Dexcom the policy seem to be more liberal and I can get 5 sensors and 3 boxes of test strips if I am out of supplies. But even a failed transmitter doesn’t seem to get me better than 3-day shipping. My suppliers have failed me in the past and I don’t trust them to bail me out in an emergency. So I always tell them that I have fewer supplies than I really have. Because….

Diabetes keeps trucking along.

I have never sold excess supplies and I no longer share excess supplies. But as someone who has lived with Type 1 diabetes for 42 years, I know that I cannot risk being without insulin for 5 minutes or pump supplies for 5 hours or CGM supplies for 5 days. 

One of my Medicare diabetes online friends once told me that every 90 days she feels as though she is recreating the wheel and resetting her diabetes life. With Dexcom it is every 30 days.

I get it now. That’s the game. And that is the game I play.

Moving into 2019: Diabetes and Not Diabetes

We’re ten days into 2019 and life is the same. But not really the same. Oh yeah, it’s probably the same but it’s nice to use the reset of a new year to check out where I am. With things related to diabetes. And things not related to diabetes.

Geographical change:

I abandon the cold of Minnesota every year after Christmas and snowbird my way to Arizona for 4 months. I have been here about two weeks and we are finally warming up after super cold temperatures and snow in the mountains. We have had a couple of rainy days but mostly the sun shines and my spirits soar. I don’t have to worry about slipping on the Minnesota ice.

Diabetes Stuff:

In early December I wrote about going back to my Animas Vibe pump due to occlusion alarms and other frustrations with my Tandem X2 pump. I went back to the X2 for my endocrinologist appointment later in December because I want my medical records to show nothing other than Tandem use. Medicare Part B insulin and pump supplies require the serial number of my pump and I don’t want to risk coverage nor do I want to put my endocrinologist in a situation of having to fudge on what pump I am using. Then because I was traveling to Arizona, I wanted to wear my in-warranty pump so that if the second pump in my suitcase was lost because of shenanigans while I was being groped by TSA, it would be the old “worthless” pump.

But very quickly in Arizona, I got frustrated again with occlusion alarms on my Tandem pump. So I ditched it again and am back to my Animas pump. I called Tandem to report that I was having occlusion alarms and indicated that I just wanted that on my record not a pump replacement. Since I have had occlusion alarms with three different Tandem pumps, I am not optimistic that a new pump will make a difference and I don’t want to deal with it until I have access to the Dexcom G6 and Basal IQ. For Medicare users, that is expected to start happening in April. Until then I will continue with my workhorse Animas pump that delivers insulin and never has occlusion alarms or other intrusions into my life. As always, please note that I am a huge fan of Tandem and do not regret my t:slim X2 purchase. I just regret that I am one of the unfortunate souls who has occlusion alarms and struggles to succeed with this pump.

Diabetes, Arthritis, and Lifestyle:

I have previously mentioned that I am giving up extreme hikes of 12+ miles in the mountains to preserve the remaining cartilage in my painful arthritic feet. I don’t want to have foot surgery especially as I am finding that my August hand surgery solved some of my problems but not all of my problems. I have no confidence that foot surgery will turn me into a 25 year old athlete again….

I am finding new activities and am attending fitness classes three times a week. Plus I ride my bike to everything in my community and never use my car or golf cart. So far I have been keeping in touch with my hiking friends and right now for me the social connection is far more important than the athletic connection.

Kinda Broken:

A lot of things in my life kinda work but are kinda broken. This is definitely a #1stWorldProblem section. 

The remote for our main TV does not turn on the tuner or cable box and we must do that manually. If you forget, button pushing randomly turns on some devices and turns off others. When the TV dies, it will require an expensive redo. Until then, we just figure it out and make it work.

My husband broke the battery compartment door of my golf laser gun. To get my distance on the golf course, I push up on the bottom of the gun, push the button, and hope to get the distance. Yeah, it works but is annoying and one more challenge for my arthritic hands. But I don’t play a huge amount of golf and don’t want to invest in a new laser gun. When this one works. Sorta.

The screen lock button on my iPad is stuck. I should get it fixed but right now I added an Accessibility Feature button that allows me to turn off the screen with a few clicks. Annoying but a cheap fix.

The garage door manual close button doesn’t work due to a lightening strike last year. So I have to enter the code which works fine but is an extra kinda-broke step. 

My August hand surgery fixed one of the bad joints in my left hand. But it didn’t fix the joint that hurts when I play golf. And the bad elbow wasn’t even addressed. So a hand brace and an elbow strap make golf possible.

Totally Broken but Fixed:

When I flew into Arizona in late December and picked up my husband’s car at the airport lot, the car screamed brake failure and stranded me in a rocky industrial lot north of the airport. AAA, a loaner car, and an eventual warranty repair got me home in a few hours and the car back in our garage a few days later. Thanks heavens that the brakes failed before I got to the highway.

We have dealt with a quirky HP printer for several years where it always needs to have its network settings re-entered weekly just to print a crossword puzzle. Finally it got an unfixable error message and we now have a new Epson printer that promises to be more reliable. I hope. New printer=$90. Ink for new printer=$70. Argh!

Still Broken:

Yeah. My pancreas is still broken. But what’s new???

Abby the Black Lab is doing okay but is in pain due to arthritis and other health issues. She started laser treatments today and the prognosis is good for easing her symptoms. She is still happy and eats and drinks well. And she looks super cool in the doggie sunglasses required during her laser treatments. But she is an old dog and age is not fixable….

*******

Happy New Year to all of my readers and may 2019 be a good year for you and your family.

A Tandem Vacation

Is it back to the future or forward to the past? 

I’m not quite sure.

What I do know is that this month is my two-year anniversary using a Tandem insulin pump and I just went back to using my Animas Vibe. I am hoping that an older, simpler pump will ease my navigation through the current dark clouds of my Type 1 diabetes. I wrote a blogpost in late November about my diabetes life as a country music ballad and things haven’t changed much. My elderly dog is recovering well from pneumonia but struggling to move around due to arthritis and an injured foot. The cold and cloudiness of late fall continue to trap me in gloom and icy streets prevent neighborhood walks. I have been in an extended funk where my diabetes doesn’t follow the expectations of “If I do A, then B will happen.” A lot of time I do A and seemingly nothing happens. Is it the pump? Is it the insulin? Is it my behavior? Is it one of Diatribe’s 42 factors that can impact blood sugar? I am burdened by diabetes technology that doesn’t give me sufficient control over intrusive beeps and sirens.

Many of you know that when I get frustrated with my D-Life, I try new tools with the conviction that there is a solution to BG frustrations. I have added Lantus as an adjunct to pump therapy with the Untethered Regimen. I have adopted low carb diets and reset my life with a month of Whole 30. I have changed types of insulin and models of infusion sets. Wil DuBois of Diabetes Mine wrote an article this week titled “To Pump or Not to Pump with Diabetes?” and shared his feelings about the benefits of changing up your D-regimen: 

“I find that any time I change from one tool to another, I do better. If I changed every two months, I’d probably stay in control. I think it’s because change makes you focus. That, or diabetes is an intelligent alien parasite that can be caught off-guard only for a short time.”

But back to the subject of this post. I am using my Animas Vibe in place of my Tandem t:slim X2. I have always relied on the Vibe as a backup pump so it is not a bad idea to road test it after two years in the closet. I figured that I would quickly miss the X2 but have instead discovered that I really like this old pump.

I was concerned that going back to scrolling for carb and BG numbers would be horrible but in many ways it is easier than using a touchscreen and navigating through multiple “Are you sure?” screens. I really appreciate the immediate bolus delivery of the Vibe. With Animas, I program the bolus, it whirrs, and delivers insulin before I can get the pump back in my pocket. With Tandem, I program the bolus, it delays for a while, micro-boluses, and eventually finishes with a confirmatory vibrate a minute or two or three later. The Animas clip is a delight with its easy attachment and actually holds the pump securely on my waistband. Temporary basals are simple to enter and a temp basal of zero does not result in an annoying warning alert several minutes later. The Combo Bolus function remembers my last setting rather than requiring a recreation of the split and duration each time. My arthritic hands are having an easier time with the Vibe buttons than with the increasingly stiff T-button on my X2.

There are lots of wonderful things about Tandem pumps but I have been one of the unlucky people who gets occlusion alarms. Most users don’t get them. The vast majority of the alarms are false. I just hit “Resume Insulin” and go on my way. Lately I have had a couple of alarms that actually required replacement of the infusion set and/or cartridge. I have done extensive troubleshooting with Tandem over the years and am on my 4th pump. Only one of those pumps did not give me occlusion alarms and it unfortunately had a defective T-button. I never had occlusions in 12 years of pumping with Medtronic and Animas.

I am tired of troubleshooting. I sometimes experience one or two occlusion alarms a week and then go a while without them. But after two years of alarms, I think about occlusions almost every time I bolus. I average 8-9 boluses per day and that is a lot of thinking about occlusions. I am tired of holding the pump with the tubing extended post-bolus to prevent occlusions. I am tired of feeling guilty for stubbornly refusing to use the Tandem case and for not changing my cartridge every 3 days. I have a low TDD of insulin and an every 3-day cartridge change results in wasting as much insulin as I use. I do replace my infusion set every 2 days.

Longterm I know that I will eventually be back to Tandem. I am probably just being a pouty and whiny problem child. Despite fewer alarms and intrusions into my life, the Vibe has not cured my diabetes but I am doing better. I am committed to Dexcom and thus don’t envision switching back to Medtronic. I am super excited about getting access to the Dexcom G6 and Basal IQ; as someone on Medicare, that should happen in the spring. Hopefully the benefits of Basal IQ and eventually Control IQ will outweigh the insulin delivery problems. An Animas pump is not a longterm option. Johnson & Johnson abandoned the pump market and there is no customer support for my out-of-warranty Vibe. If it quits working or the case breaks, I am done. Fortunately I have a lot of supplies and was recently given enough reservoirs to last for several years. I can use Tandem infusion sets by substituting the t:lock tubing with luer lock tubing.

I think highly of Tandem and have always had good customer service. Until starting to use the t:slim X2, I was never a problem child with diabetes tech and continue to believe that there is something wrong with an insulin pump that frequently quits delivering insulin. Is it the design of the pump? Is it my low insulin use? Is it random bad luck? Am I at fault? I don’t know and am at a point as Gone with the Wind’s Rhett Butler would say: “Frankly, my dear, I don’t give a damn.”

Diabetes Country Ballad: One of THOSE Posts

Diabetes Awareness Month is not over so I guess I am allowed to  post a blood and gore photo. The bleeding on my belly was much worse than the tissue shows, so just envision 10x the blood of the photo. Oh let’s just be outrageous and imagine 100x the blood! It is still November and I can b*tch about diabetes and the frustrations of dealing with my D-tech. I can be strong on the outside and be sad inside. It is my 42nd November with diabetes and I can do whatever I darn well please.

Today was a weird day and it ended up being a perfect 12-hour basal test. 

My dog Abby had surgery two months ago for a condition called “larangeal paralysis” for which the poster child is elderly Labrador retrievers. The biggest risk of this surgery is aspiration pneumonia. I knew that Abby was sick yesterday and early this morning her lethargy and 103.3 temperature sent us to the emergency vet. She is currently in doggie intensive care inside an oxygen tent with an IV for fluids and antibiotics. We have chosen to treat this episode of pneumonia knowing that we won’t treat again. 

But I didn’t get breakfast.

Then I had previously promised to take care of the grandchildren today. I’m not quite sure why the older ones didn’t have school, but they didn’t. I could have canceled, but since Abby was in the dog hospital, I picked up the kids and we came to my house for Christmas crafts, game time, and doing our best to keep 18-month year old Natalie off of the stairs. I fed the kids lunch but didn’t get around to eating myself.

No lunch.

I drove the kids home mid-afternoon and then stopped at Costco on the way home. I got home at about 5:00 and my BG was at close to 100 after starting the day at 80-ish. Over the next 2 hours, nothing much happened. So a perfect basal test. A 20-point rise over 12 hours is testament to great basal rates and I was kinda feelin’ okay about that.

But then.

I bolused 32g carbs for the Whole 30 stuffed pepper I was having for dinner. The hubby hates dinners like this but he is out of town. 

Bolus. Tandem pump alarms for an occlusion alarm. Ugh! My TruSteel site was a little sore this afternoon so I changed out the site but not the tubing or cartridge. Tried the bolus again. Nope! Another occlusion alarm. 

Although I am a Tandem “doesn’t follow the rules” girl, I changed out both the cartridge and the infusion set. I tried to pull the 100+ units of insulin from the previous cartridge but it was mostly bubbles and I just tossed it. When I pulled out the TruSteel set, I got gobs of blood. My bathroom countertop shows the riffraff of my diabetes debris.

New infusion set, new cartridge, and new insulin. I bolused again for the stuffed pepper. 

Last time I looked at my CGM, it was 139 with a slanted arrow up. 

Remember my BG was about 100 at 6:23pm. 

So my daytime basals are good as my BG only rose 20 points over 12 hours. But my diabetes tech failed me: both the infusion site and the finicky occlusion alarms of my Tandem pump. I have double-bolused for dinner and my BG is still rising. Well, actually I tripled or quadrupled bolused but the pump alarmed on the first attempts.

It is now after 8:00pm and my BG is still rising. I am hungry for dinner but won’t eat until I am convinced that my infusion site, pump, and insulin are functioning properly.

It is now 9:00pm and the numbers are not going down.

Sometimes the hardest part of diabetes is that when you do it right, it does you wrong. 

A country music ballad of…

Betrayal, Frustration, and Sadness.

********

Tuesday morning note: Abby is home and doing well.

Type 1 Diabetes and my Medicare Drug Plan

There is nothing special about today’s blogpost. It is just my experience choosing a new Medicare Part D drug plan. My only advice to you is to consider what you require in a drug plan and what the financial ramifications are. Don’t assume that what you used in 2018 is your best choice for 2019.

I now understand one way that Medicare drug plans make lots of money. I am only in my second year of Medicare and it is obvious that it would be easier to stay with what I am doing rather than make a change is logical and financially-expedient. Inertia. Yeah, it’s easier to do nothing than to do something. It can be laziness or just comfort in living with what you know. But you have to remember that doing nothing is a decision and that decision may not be the best decision.

My current drug plan has worked well since I went on Medicare in the spring of 2017. But I have recently started taking an arthritis drug that is not part of that plan’s formulary. It is not a hugely expensive drug; it is just a lesser-prescribed anti-inflammatory. I have received an exception-to-formulary approval for the medicine through 2019 but the monthly co-pay is almost as much as my monthly premium cost. 

So I have wisely gotten off my duff and gone to the Medicare Find-a-Plan website to compare 2019 Part D plans available in my area. I entered my zip code, answered some basic questions, and listed the drugs that I take. I only take 3 drugs under my Part D plan and it didn’t take long to enter the names and dosages. If you have a long list, you can save your drugs to a password-protected drug ID so that you don’t have to enter them every time you visit the website.

I entered my desired pharmacies and selected the option to look at drug plans. You can also use this option to compare Advantage plans.

The wisdom of examining my 2019 choices was immediately apparent. Having entered Walgreens, CVS, and mail order as choices, the cheapest option combining premiums, deductibles, and drug costs was $231 for CVS mail order and $233 for CVS retail. The tenth cheapest plan would be almost $900! Staying with my current plan would be almost $700. Formulary is the name-of-the-game in choosing a Medicare drug plan….

Sometimes money is not the only decision-making factor in choosing a drug plan. As mentioned above, my cheapest drug plan option for 2019 would involve switching to CVS and I have three reasons for wanting to stay with Walgreens.

One, I have used Walgreens for most of my adult life. It has always worked well and my philosophy is “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

Two, as someone who uses an insulin pump, my insulin is covered under Medicare Part B rather than through my drug plan. The savings are huge because Medicare pays 80% of the cost of my insulin and my Medigap policy pays the remaining 20% leaving me with no out-of-pocket cost for insulin. Due to Medicare regulations and unawareness of this coverage by many pharmacies, it can be difficult to establish and maintain Part B insulin coverage. Before I started Medicare, I was advised by several Type 1 friends that Walgreens and its national Medicare department is one of the best pharmacies for setting up Part B insulin. I have online diabetes friends who get their Part B insulin successfully from CVS, Krogers, and other pharmacy chains, but once again for me “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.” I could probably get Part B insulin at Walgreens and other prescriptions at CVS, but I prefer having my prescriptions with one pharmacy. Convenience for me and I think that the occasional glitches in receiving Part B insulin are more easily resolved because I am well-known at my local pharmacy.

Three, I am a snowbird and leave the cold and snow of Minnesota in late December. The idea of transferring my prescriptions in 2019 to CVS through a pharmacy in Arizona seems overly complicated. I am willing to pay a premium to avoid the potential problems of the switch.

I am mostly sure of the drug plan that I am selecting for 2019. It only has two stars out of five stars and at Amazon that might scare me. But my previous Part D plan only had two stars and it was fine. I am lucky that I do not take expensive drugs and even luckier that I do not pay for insulin through Part D. But even still, a wrong part D plan could be an expensive mistake. If I do nothing, I will be automatically enrolled in my previous plan and that would be an expensive default. FYI I do not have to cancel the old plan; that will happen automatically when I I enroll in a new plan.

This blogpost is certainly not a “how-to” post. However, it is a reminder that if you are on Medicare, don’t assume that what you did in 2018 is the best choice for 2019. I’ve gotten off my duff. Be sure that you do the same. You have until December 7 to make a change or confirm that your current plan is still your best option.

RDBlog Week Day 1: Wildcard // Fitting In

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Today’s Topic:  Everything Else – Is there something we missed in this year’s prompts?  This wildcard is your place to add it in.  Not everything made our list so be adventurous and take us in a new direction.  Sometimes the everything wildcard is the seed of a new prompt for next year so let your mind roam and see where it goes.  Maybe mindfulness is on your mind?  Or perhaps you have a funny story?  We are all ready to hear the scoop on what is on your mind that was missed elsewhere.

Laddie_Head SquareI started blogging in the spring of 2013 in order to share my life with Type 1 Diabetes and to chronicle my journey towards Medicare. My blog title reflected the requirement to Test my blood sugar many times a day while knowing that diabetes was fickle and that I needed to Guess what would happen in the next ten minutes and the next ten hours. My attitude was and is to do my best and Go despite living with a health condition where sometimes 1 + 1 = 2 and other times equals 237 or 174 or 62. Although I stated in my first blogpost that I was living with several other autoimmune/inflammatory conditions, arthritis was not a big enough deal to warrant a specific mention. Five and a half years later I find that arthritis limits my life much more than diabetes. Sadly the list of favorite activities that I have abandoned or will have to abandon due to arthritis is growing longer. 

I have had Type 1 diabetes since 1976 and have been active in the Diabetes Online Community for almost 15 years. I had no problem finding my niche because my diabetes is “classic” Type 1 diabetes—whatever that means. The diabetes world used to be easily divided into Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes with a few pregnant ladies having Gestational Diabetes. But over the years diabetes social media has become more complicated as it has become apparent that there may be as many manifestations of diabetes as there are people with diabetes. In addition to Type 1, Type 2, Gestational, there is Type 1.5, LADA, pre-diabetes, MODY, Type 1 with insulin resistance, Type 2 with autoimmune components, and etc. and etc.

So here I am taking steps into the social media world of arthritis and finding myself in the “not sure where I fit in” category. I have a couple of online diabetes friends who live with rheumatoid arthritis and they have invited me into their arthritis online world. But I do not have RA and frankly have an easier journey of pain and disability than my RA friends. Interesting my “serious” and “systemic” arthritis is inflammatory spondyloarthropathy which can be every bit as debilitating as RA. But as the years go by it is apparent that the progression of my spondylitis fits very well with “undifferentiated spondyloarthropathy” as outlined in this article. My disease does not seem to have worsened much in the last 10 years and I continue to be very responsive to NSAIDs. 

Inflammatory spondyloarthropathy can have effects on peripheral joints of the hands, wrists, feet, and ankles. But all along my rheumatologist has emphasized that my peripheral joint issues are osteoarthritis. If I had doubts about his diagnosis, both a foot specialist and hand surgeon analyzed my x-rays this summer as “classic osteoarthritis.” In August I had surgery for the carpometacarpal (thumb/wrist) joint of my left hand. Foot surgery has also been recommended but I have chosen to do everything I can to modify my lifestyle to escape surgery. Unfortunately lifestyle modifications mean no more extreme hiking, no more long walks in nearby regional parks, and no more aerobics classes. I gave up tennis and pickle ball a long time ago. Fortunately I am able to participate in yoga and cycling classes at my local YMCA. I know that in the future swimming and water aerobics will be reasonable choices.

I used to feel out of place in the waiting room of my rheumatologist’s office. I don’t require a walker and for the most part feel strong and self-sufficient. But I look at myself at the gym these days. I wear lace-up wrist braces on both hands and last week added a knee brace for a tweaked knee. Unseen, but very important, are the orthotic inserts in my shoes. Then I add the diabetes paraphernalia of a continuous glucose monitor on the back of my arm and an insulin pump on my waistband. 

So I am not sure exactly how I will fit into RDBlog Week. But one thing about arthritis is that it is an equal-opportunity umbrella for many rheumatic diseases. Pain and disability don’t discriminate on whether or not you want to participate. I have found tremendous support in the online diabetes world and hope to find an equally supportive community in the arthritis world.

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If you’d like to check out other RABlog Week posts from today, click on this link.

Brittle Diabetes, Hand Surgery, and the Dog

My blog has been languishing in summer doldrums and it is time to check in or check out. Lest you think that the three subjects in the title are connected, they’re not—except kinda sorta.

Brittle Diabetes

Looking for information to update a health history document, I recently reviewed my medical record from a previous internist. I thought that his notes from my first visit were interesting. What jumped out was “Brittle DM” at the top of the page. A few weeks ago there was a Facebook discussion about the word “brittle’ as a descriptor of diabetes. Most people considered it to be an outdated and inaccurate term that should be trashed. I am a little more open-minded about the subject and believe that there is a small subset of people with Type 1 diabetes whose disease is much more difficult to manage than that of most of us. Diabetes Forecast had an article in 2014 that addressed the brittle diabetes debate and quoted a Brazilian endocrinologist who described brittle diabetes as “glucose fluctuation so severe that a person cannot have a normal life.”

I am not writing about brittle DM in order to start a terminology debate, but rather to illustrate that in the past many of us with Type 1 were labeled brittle and labile. My internist was not ignorant about diabetes in 2002 and other notes mention Type 1. He actually understood clearly that my diabetes was different than that of most of his other patients. As far as I know he had only one other Type 1 patient and he often asked about my technology, especially my CGM in later years, to learn more to help this other patient. 

Other comments from this visit showed that I was still using NPH despite having previously been under the care of a renowned endocrinologist. The new doctor immediately transitioned me to Lantus which resulted in the biggest improvement ever in my diabetes care. No reputable doctor could read this chart note without thinking Type 1 diabetes as I had frozen shoulder, dealt with hypoglycemia, and took Synthroid for the common comorbidity of hypothyroidism.

So in the old days, I had brittle diabetes and lots of the baggage that goes along with it. In 2018 I have regular hard-to-manage pain-in-the-neck Type 1 diabetes  and lots of the comorbidity baggage. 

Hand Surgery

Many of you know that I had hand surgery in mid-August for the carpometacarpal thumb joint of my left hand. Arthritis and bone spurs had resulted in enough pain that it was time to get it fixed. My rheumatologist assured me that this is one of the most successful joint surgeries and I hope that is the case. I am recovering as expected and trying to curb my impatience at not being good-as-new yet. I am still wearing a brace and dutifully doing the assigned exercises 3 times a day. I am back to spinning classes for exercise because I can do it mostly one-handed. My body and soul miss yoga but know that I can’t put enough weight on the hand to participate safely. I am on the mend and have at least recovered enough to type two-handed. BTW arthritis in this joint is one of the many gifts that post-menopausal women receive more often than other people….

The Dog

In May I shared that 12-year old Abby the Black Lab was diagnosed with chronic bronchitis. Despite using an inhaler all summer, her breathing has gotten worse and it has been determined that she has laryngeal paralysis, or more specifically GOLPP. The only treatment at her stage of the disease is surgery and I always swore that I wouldn’t subject a 12-year old dog to surgery. But Abby is still active, happy, eating and drinking well and with the vet’s advice, we have determined that euthanasia isn’t the ‘right” choice at this time. She is having surgery next Tuesday with a specialist in “Lar Par” (vet lingo). I hope we have made the right choice because Abby has always been a much-loved and perfect dog. Abby used to write posts for Test Guess and Go and this is my favorite.

The Intertwined Relationship?

Exercise is a cornerstone of my diabetes management. Hand surgery, as well as foot arthritis, has limited my exercise this summer and I am unable to do things like mow the yard and walk the golf course. Although I am doing intense studio cycling classes, the rest of my day is fairly inactive. Abby is not allowed to go on walks until she has recovered from surgery and that is another unfortunate reduction in my activity level. Diabetes does not like that and I keep bumping up the insulin and periodically rage bolusing. It doesn’t help that I have a recently replaced insulin pump and wonder if I just need different settings than the old pump. Or whether it is this or that or who knows what. My diabetes may not be brittle, but it sure is hard to figure out sometimes. So yes, everything is related: diabetes, arthritis surgery, and the dog.

Thank-you Tandem: A Replacement Pump

I recently wrote two blogposts (here and here) about false occlusion alarms on my Tandem t:slim X2 pump. I was not shy about sharing my frustrations and I want to update my story with the fingers-crossed!!! resolution of my problem.

I have always had good customer service from Tandem. Despite the long wait times on hold reported by some people on Facebook, I have never had to wait more than a couple of minutes. I have never yelled, cried, or been rude to Tandem tech reps, but lately I have worried that they might start to label me as a “customer from h*ll” as I repeatedly called to report more occlusion alarms.

The problem with false occlusion alarms is that when the pump is not shrieking about the stoppage of insulin, it works fine. Thus my pump passed all the tests that that Tandem support had me go through and in the end the in-house reps did not have the authority to authorize a replacement pump. The issue was referred to my local trainer. 

When my first X2 had weekly occlusion alarms for many months, I met with this trainer to review my technique on reservoir fills and infusion sets. We have a good relationship and when she heard that I had experienced 5 occlusion alarms in 9 days, she arranged for an immediate X2 replacement. The new pump arrived within 24 hours and I have been happily carrying the case-less pump in my pocket. So far there have been no occlusion alarms and I am cautiously optimistic that my problem is solved.

Although I am happy with the new pump, I don’t seem to be able to stay away from Velcro. Maybe it is an addiction…. Or maybe it is just the inability to accept diabetes tech when it doesn’t quite fit into my life. Soon I will be heading to South Carolina for a few days in the ocean and pool with grandkids and family. After that I am having hand surgery. Both occasions require a clip on the pump. 

The Tandem case with a clip would work for the surgery but not for the beach. I want a clip on my pump to attach it to the pants portion of my tankini swimsuit and the case would work for that. But when I am in the water, I want to use my Aquapac pump case (actually a Radio Microphone case) purchased many years ago as a waterproof case for my Medtronic pumps. It is an expensive and somewhat bulky solution that allows me to wear my pump strapped around my waist with guaranteed water protection. The Tandem case is too large to fit into the Aquapac. 

So I am back to a Nite ize Hip clip applied directly to my pump. Rather than using the two-sided tape that comes with the clips, I use Scotch Outdoor Mounting Tape because it is equally strong but much easier to remove. Unfortunately the Nite Ize clip is only marginally better than the Tandem clip when it comes to falling off my waistband and I applied Velcro hook pieces to both sides of the clip interior to provide some grip. People on Facebook have reported using heat shrink on the Tandem clip but I am not sure how that would work with the different design of the Nite Ize clip. And anyway, Velcro is what I know and Velcro is what I have in my junk drawer.

Today I have a new pump that seems to accept living in my pocket without a case. I have a Nite Ize clip applied directly to the pump which allows me to clip the pump to my swimsuit but is small enough to fit into various pockets and the Aquapac pump case. The clip is attached to my pump with a strong tape that is easy to remove when I decide to go clip-less or use the case instead. 

Pump. Clip. Velcro. No occlusions. That just about sums it up.