Diabetes, Arthritis, and the Dog

I left Arizona in mid-April and have spent the last month in Minnesota watching snow melt followed by grass turning green and trees getting leaves. For better or worse, medical stuff has taken a good chunk of my time in recent weeks. 

The Dog:  Abby the Black Lab is 12 years old which is old for a big dog. For the last 6 months her breathing has been loud with occasional gagging and coughing. It turns out that she has chronic bronchitis which is kind of like COPD for dogs. Her treatment? A steroid inhaler. The vet told me that I could check out prices locally but recommended that I buy the inhalers from Canada. Sounds familiar for those of us on insulin…. One inhaler at Costco. $369. One inhaler from Canada. $69. My understanding is that while it is illegal to import prescription drugs from Canada, the ban is not being enforced. I am not losing sleep over the threat that I could go to jail for importing medication for my dog. Dr. Google mentions that canine patients can be “uncooperative” when dealing with inhalers and the Aerodawg chamber. Well, duh.

Pump Supplies:  More than once I have written about my need to change infusion sets every two days. I had always received sufficient supplies with no problems until 2018. I recently criticized CCS Medical for being less than helpful in resolving the problem and switched to another supplier. Meanwhile reflecting the power of Social Media I received a call from a customer service supervisor at CCS and I suspect that she would have helped me to navigate the process. But I was several weeks into working with Solara Medica and it didn’t make sense to go back to CCS. I did eventually get my 45 infusion sets from Solara but it wouldn’t have happened without my bulldog sales rep Stephanie. My endo’s assistant had to submit, resubmit, and re-resubmit medical necessity forms and office notes. The normal 30-day BG log wasn’t enough and I had to provide a 60-day log. Ironically none of the ever-morphing requirements for 2-day site changes had anything to do with adhesive allergies and site infections. I am now good for 3 months and dread starting over again in July.

Fiasp:  At my April endo appointment, I was given a Fiasp sample. There were no vials available and I took home a yellow and blue 300ml pen with several pen needles. I didn’t do systematic testing to see if Fiasp injections brought down highs better than Novolog, but I assume it did. I filled a pump cartridge and started using it in my Tandem X2 pump. Immediately I seemed to have an easier time with my morning BG’s.  Unfortunately as others have reported Fiasp seemed to run out of steam on Day 3. By Day 4 my numbers were terrible and I switched back to Novolog.

Was this is a fair trial of Fiasp? Absolutely not and it doesn’t matter. Fiasp is not covered by Basic Medicare and I have no interest in paying out of pocket for it. I had to laugh because several times on my blog, I have mentioned that my sister is very adverse to changes in her diabetes care. After a few days of Fiasp I determined that I am entirely too lazy to figure out pump settings to be successful with a new insulin. Meanwhile my sister has switched her mealtime insulin from Regular to Humalog and will be starting Tresiba soon. She is actually considering ordering the Freestyle Libre! So who is adverse to change???

Arthritis:  A year ago I wrote that arthritis is the “health problem that most threatens my Pollyanna “Life is great!” philosophy.” My systemic arthritis is well-controlled with NSAIDs, but degenerative osteoarthritis in my hands and feet is relentless. Last week my foot doctor indicated that surgery is the only option for my left foot. I am not totally on board with cutting into my foot. It fixes one joint but I still have tendon and heel problems. And then I have my right foot. Psychologically I struggle with having this surgery because it opens the door to dealing with my other bad joints. There is something comforting with staying with the pain I know and avoiding the pain and unknown results of surgery. 

I will schedule surgery for mid-August with the option to cancel it. Two weeks on the couch with drugs will be followed by two months in a boot with a knee scooter. In the short run I have abandoned the close-by health club where I enjoy the fitness classes but know that they are not good for me. I have joined the YMCA which has an extensive schedule of fitness and water aerobics classes directed at various levels of senior fitness. Argh! I can’t even stand to write this but I know that I will feel better. 

Frozen Shoulder:  I think that I am in the early stages of frozen shoulder on the right side. I am unfortunately an expert on this condition and on the 4-year plan. I had my first FS in 2001 on the left side. Four years later my right shoulder was affected and four years later the left again. Now it’s back to the right. Only the first one was horrible. The rest have been annoying and long-lasting but not hugely debilitating. Don’t tell me to stretch the shoulder in the shower. As I wrote in 2013, “if you can get rid of your “frozen shoulder” by doing a week’s worth of exercises in the shower, you don’t have adhesive capsulitis.” My experience with frozen shoulder indicates that it is an inflammatory disease-driven condition that is more related to duration of diabetes than A1c levels. Whatever. If you want to learn more about frozen shoulder, check out my “Argh! Frozen Shoulder” blogpost.

Summary:  That’s it for today. The dog is old. I’m getting older and my feet hurt. So do my hands. I’m a chicken when it comes to surgery but hate the idea of quitting the activities that I love. I had diabetes yesterday and still will tomorrow. But the sky is blue and the grass is green. Life is good.

Happy spring to everyone! 🌷🌷🌷

Arthritis on a Diabetes Blog

When it comes to living with both Type 1 diabetes and arthritis, I don’t experience the amount of pain and disability that burdens some of my favorite people in the DOC. Rick Phillips who deals with rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis shared his story on my blog a couple of years ago. Rick tirelessly advocates for people with diabetes, but he often admits that arthritis negatively impacts his life much more than diabetes. Molly Schreiber has had Type 1 diabetes for 28 years. Her rheumatoid arthritis is a formidable opponent and she deals with the worst that RA can dish out. In general I am doing okay when it comes to living with arthritis. Except when I’m not….

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I am good at diabetes.

I am bad at arthritis.

I have had a tough summer. Although I was diagnosed diagnosed with inflammatory spondyloarthropathy over 10 years ago, my problems are peripheral. My hands hurt and my thumb joints are shot. In May I woke up with horrible heel and foot pain which continues to get worse despite following doctor’s orders.

I don’t write about arthritis very often because I am a diabetes blogger. Type 1 diabetes is a constant in my life and I do little without taking diabetes into account. After 40+ years of T1, I have no major D-complications. At the same time diabetes is a “needy condition” that requires constant affirmation and is entrenched in my psyche. More than once I have mentioned that I deal with other inflammatory and autoimmune conditions in addition to diabetes. I once wrote about a skin problem called annulare granuloma and mentioned that I felt helpless in dealing with it because “When you have Type 1 diabetes, you get used to the idea that WHAT I DO MAKES A DIFFERENCE in my health.” I’ve never bothered writing about hypothyroidism because it goes hand-in-hand with T1 diabetes. Mine was discovered through a routine blood test 21 years ago. I’ve never struggled with symptoms and my Synthroid-generic dose is the same as prescribed in 1996.

Arthritis. This is the thing that I’ve not written about and it is the health problem that most threatens my Pollyanna “Life is great!” philosophy.

I think that some of the personality traits that make me “good” at diabetes make me bad at arthritis. Diabetes loves people who overdo things and power through when you don’t feel great. Diabetes thrives on doing the same thing over and over again. Arthritis does not reward overuse of my body and I know that I would feel better if I didn’t sync as many steps on my Fitbit. (Actually I put my Fitbit in the drawer a few weeks ago because I need to rest.) I know that I would feel better if I gave up playing golf. I quit tennis a dozen years ago and still feel sad about that. I don’t know about hiking, but I suspect that I would do better with fewer mountains and more walks around the block.

It all comes down to pain.

Unfortunately sitting at home doing nothing is worse than pain and diabetes is a bear when your body is glued to a chair. I have always been active and I attribute my relatively good health to exercise. Blood sugars are better with movement and I believe that exercise helps ward off D-complications such as heart disease and neuropathy. Transitioning to a couch potato life because of sore feet and swollen fingers doesn’t seem like an optimal life strategy to me.

But exercise currently brings me pain.

I am strong but pain makes me sad.

My primary arthritis diagnosis is inflammatory spondyloarthropathy and it is a type of arthritis where many people feel better moving rather than resting. It is a type of arthritis that fits my “can’t stand to sit down” personality. But my hands and feet are diagnosed as osteoarthritis. I’m struggling with achilles tendonosis, heel pain, and elbow tendonitis. Overuse “old people” conditions.

Back to diabetes. What happens to my blood sugars when I am not active? Mostly they get worse. But I can take more insulin and then they are OK. But I gain weight and my insulin sensitivity goes to h*ll.

I am a self-manager of my diabetes and my endocrinologist is totally mostly on board with that. Diabetes usually does best when you manage it in the moment (AKA Sugar Surfing) and my Dexcom G5 protects me from most of the submarine lows that drive my endo crazy. My rheumatologist has never gone ballistic at my decision-making, but he occasionally looks askance when I arrive at an appointment and say that I reduced the dosage of one medication and refused to take another. At the same time he is older than I am and still plays tennis. He goads me to get back to the courts and suggests that I wear an arm strap to help with elbow tendonitis and use more of the topical Diclofenac gel to ease pain. More than any of my other doctors he understands how my medical issues are woven together in a spiderweb of autoimmune and inflammatory conditions.

I am an uber-educated diabetes patient. I understand my disease and voraciously read diabetes research articles, websites, blogs, and message boards. I am an active participant in the DOC and credit my fellow PWD’s for most of my knowledge and activism. I arrive at my endocrinology appointments with printouts of BG statistics and always have a list of pertinent questions.

I am less capable when it comes to my arthritis. To tell you the truth, I am not completely sure of my diagnosis. I do not have rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and once you don’t have that, it can be hard to find a niche for your condition. My medical records reflect terms such as inflammatory spodyloarthropathy, inflammatory polyarthritis, and osteoarthritis.

When I look at the future, I am much more afraid of physical limitations due to arthritis than I am of diabetes. I don’t worry about diabetes complications and have never experienced diabetes burnout for more than five minutes. But what will I do if walking is unbearably painful, elbow pain blocks me from playing golf and carrying my grandchildren, and hand pain rules out opening a jar?

I am good at diabetes.

Unfortunately arthritis scares the bejesus out of me.

Pain is a formidable opponent.

Pain.

* The image for the pain measurement scale was purchased from shutterstock.com.