Learning to Like Tidepool

In previous blogposts I have mentioned my frustration with finding a platform where I can download and view data from all of my diabetes devices. Diasend used to be my go-to site and would still work for me if I used my Dexcom G5 receiver. But I am a hipster-oldster who uses her iPhone and Apple Watch for CGM numbers. An email to Diasend followed by a phone call to Dexcom last week indicated that there are no plans to allow G5 Mobile integration into Diasend for US users. Dexcom Clarity is great for analyzing my CGM data but it doesn’t include pump or BG meter information. Tandem t:connect allows me to download my pump and Freestyle Lite meters but does not show CGM information. Maybe when the Dexcom G5 is integrated into the t:slim X2 later this year, the Tandem site will include all of my information. Although I love mySugr and the cute monsters, I don’t need a day-to-day logging app. Pretty quickly I get down to Tidepool as the only platform that is compatible with all of my devices.

My first experience with Tidepool was last fall when I participated in a research study through Glu. I downloaded my pump and meters weekly while my CGM synced to Tidepool through Apple Health. I was required to enter my food and carb counts through the Blip Notes app. The use of hashtags for notes initially bugged me but with practice it became quite easy. The Basics screen in the Blip dashboard was novel and my data was displayed in charts and domino dot patterns. I don’t recall spending much time reviewing the Daily View screen. In general I couldn’t envision how my endocrinologist would work with Tidepool because she requires printed reports. After the Glu study ended, I drifted away from Tidepool.

Fast forward 7-8 months and I am becoming a Tidepool fan. A couple of things happened to bring the website back to my attention. One, Chris Snider was hired as Community Manager and I assume that he is instrumental in the new informative emails showing up in my inbox. Two, it was announced that Tidepool users are now able to share their data with Type 1 diabetes researchers. You can learn more about the Tidepool Big Data Donation Project and how to participate at this link. Three, a recent email shared a clinician’s video featuring Diabetologist Dr. Anne Peters demonstrating how she uses and interprets Tidepool reports. I am always interested in what endocrinologists are seeing and thinking and her presentation helped me understand how I could gain insights into my diabetes using Tidepool.

I encourage you to take the opportunity to watch this video.

 

***** Interruption *****

Why do I download data?

I download data: 1) to take to every endocrinology appointment,  2) to review my numbers for a pat-on-the-head or a kick-in-the-butt, 3) to provide printed reports for Medicare which requires a 30-day log for pump supplies and a 60-day log for CGM supplies, 4) for various clinical studies and/or beta-testing apps, and 5) for curiosity to test new data platforms.

***** End of Interruption *****

Tidepool is a non-profit company and was founded in 2013 by Howard Look, a self-described nerd who has a daughter with Type 1 diabetes. Like many small diabetes tech companies it grew out of the #WeAreNotWaiting movement and is powered by geeks, D-parents, and PWD’s. As Look mentions at the end of the video, employees at Tidepool “have pancreas in the game.”

To get started with Tidepool, go to www.tidepool.org. Although you can check out the website in any browser, the Uploader is a Google App and you must use Chrome on either a Windows or Mac computer for downloading and viewing data. I have contacted Tidepool support several times by email and have always received prompt and courteous help.

Where do I go with Tidepool from here? I am pleased to be participating in the Big Data Donation Project and have recurring calendar reminders to download my pump and meters. My Dexcom G5 syncs to Tidepool continuously through Apple health. I also plan to periodically review my own D-numbers and graphs through the Blip dashboard. After 40+ years of Type 1, I am not good about day-to-day logging and probably won’t use the phone app very often, but you never know. I am currently a beta-tester for a new version of the app and maybe I’ll get hooked. Rather than reviewing my graphs and numbers on a computer, my endocrinologist uses print-outs that are eventually scanned into my medical record. In the Tidepool video above, Dr. Peters provides a glimpse of the future where diabetes data is viewed online and interactively with patients. It will be a long time before that future shows up at my doctor’s office.

In addition to exploring Tidepool.org and signing up for the Big Data Donation Project, you can learn more about the company through these links:

Diatribe (2014):  How the Tidepool Data Integration Platform Can Ease Diabetes Management: Our Interview with Tidepool CEO Howard Look

Six Until Me (2015):  #WeAreNotWaiting: The (Not So?) Brief Story of Tidepool

Diabetes Mine (2016):  Tidepool Goes Big After White House Visit

Diabetes Numbers Podcast Episode 23 (2017):  Tidepool’s Big Data Donation Project

In conclusion here are screenshots provided by Tidepool of the Blip Basics Home screen and a Daily data view. Note that the Daily view shows insulin, carbs, BG’s, and notes in the same timeline as CGM data.

One thought on “Learning to Like Tidepool

  1. I have continued to be very impressed with tidepool. I think the project is an incredibile idea.

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